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National Reconciliation Week: In this together

For National Reconciliation Week 2021 

please visit here


27 May - 3 June 2020

Reconciliation is a journey for all Australians, we are all ‘In This Together’; every one of us has a part to play when it comes to reconciliation, and in playing our part we collectively build relationships and communities that value Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, histories and cultures.  When we come together to build mutual respect and understanding, we shape a better future for all Australians,’ Karen Mundine, CEO, Reconciliation Australia.

Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples and Southern Cross University Indigenous Events Coordinating Committee are delighted to share with you a series of video podcasts featuring Elders, staff, students and community members yarning together on how we are all ‘in this together’. We wish to thank and acknowledge all our participants for their contribution in the sharing of knowledge, culture and stories.

We wish to thank and acknowledge all our participants for their contribution in the sharing of knowledge, culture and stories.


Indigenous Knowledge + Health

We invite you to listen as we yarn up what it means to be ‘in this together’ and share our knowledge where there is no hierarchy.  Instead, our knowledge is shared with mutual respect, experience, so as to learn together.  How do these concepts play out in our lives across health disciplines, curriculum, research, governance, Aboriginal culture and diverse cultural backgrounds?

Indigenous Knowledge + Health:
Video podcast duration 45 minutes. Video link 

Participants:

Janine Dunleavy is a woman of Aboriginal and Irish descent, a mother and grandmother, an aunty, a daughter, a sister and an Indigenous scholar. She holds a Bachelor of Anthropology from the University of QLD and a Master of Environment from Griffith University.  Over the years, Janine has taught Indigenous Knowledge subjects in several universities and has also worked as a case worker and family history researcher for Aboriginal community organisations. She has worked for Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples at Southern Cross University  for 6 years. Janine's research interest lie in nurturing the growth of Indigenous Knowledge and scholarship in tertiary education settings..

Atalanta Lloyd-Haynes is a woman of Aboriginal and European descent, mother of teenagers, a daughter and a sister. She is also a third year student in the Bachelor of Indigenous Knowledge course with Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples at Southern Cross University and a research intern with Committix Pty Ltd, an independent, Indigenous-owned research company.  Atalanta is currently preparing to undertake the Bachelor of Indigenous Knowledge with  Honours in 2021.

Associate Professor Megan Williams is a Wiradjuri woman through her father’s family and has over 20 years’ experience working on programs and research to improve the health and wellbeing of Indigenous people in the criminal justice system.  She works at the National Centre for Cultural Competence at the University of Sydney as the Research Lead.  Megan is passionate about public interest journalism to convey research findings and gaps and is a Director and contributing editor of health media organisation Croakey.org.

Dr Mark J Lock, PhD in Public Health, Founder and Director, Committex Pty Ltd: Australia’s only 100% owned Aboriginal research company was established in 2016 to pursue Mark’s vision of self-determination by leading culturally safe research governance.  Committex is based on the importance of committees in the corporate governance of organisations and the value of engaging with employee voices for better knowledge gathering into organisational decision making processes. The company is based on a research career focussed on the governance dimensions of public administration in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy.


Indigenous Knowledge in Education

Both Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples navigate the world through education.  Gnibi Elders, staff and students yarn up how Western and Indigenous knowledge can co-exist in mutually sustaining ways through accepting the value of listening to and respecting each other’s stories.

Indigenous Knowledge and Education:
Video podcast duration 46 minutes. Video link 

Participants:

Uncle Herb Roberts is a Widjabul Wiyabal Elder. He was born in Lismore and started life at Cubawee Mission. He has been an active member of community organisations most of his life. Uncle Herb is passionate about sharing his knowledge of culturally significant sites and stories at Evans Head. He teaches into the Bachelor of Indigenous Knowledge especially in the Caring for Country unit. Uncle Herb is an Elder in residence at Gnibi, Lismore Campus, and Co-Chair of Southern Cross University Gnibi Elders Council.

Aunty Bea Ballangarry, Gumbaynggirr Elder, Order of Australia
Aunty Bea Ballangarry is a strong proud Gumbaynggirr Elder from the Mid North Coast of NSW, who has a deep connection to the values of Family, Country and Community.  She is a born storyteller, a published poet and is pro-active in most facets of community development. Aunty Bea believes in ceremonies and rituals as a way to engage people in the experience of ‘slowing down’, becoming ‘grounded’ and ‘connected’ ‘in the now’.  She holds circles for healing, recovery and/or discovery that enable you to bring your emotions, feelings and thoughts to a sense of congruency.  Circle work is about accountability, self-reflection, authenticity and a process to find your own healing place.  This process will inevitably embrace balance, confidence and clarity.  Aunty Bea believes that circle work and rituals bring out the heart of each person’s ‘story’ and story is at the apex of any growing community. She is pro-active in the community for social justice, economic advancement and political change in a variety of ways across many openings.  Aunty Bea is Co-Chair of Southern Cross University Gnibi Elders Council and a member of WOW Women of the World in Coffs Harbour, an established community group that focuses on Honour, Respect, Connect, Courage and Empowerment. 

Janine Dunleavy:  I am a woman of Aboriginal and Irish descent, a mother and grandmother, an aunty, a daughter, a sister and an Indigenous scholar. I have a Bachelor of Anthropology from the University of QLD and a Master of Environment from Griffith University.  Over the years I have taught Indigenous Knowledge subjects in several universities and I have also worked as a family history researcher for Aboriginal community organisations. I have worked for Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples for 6 years. Currently, my research interest lies in nurturing the growth of Indigenous Knowledge and scholarship in tertiary education settings.

Dr Cathy Howlett, BA(UQ), BSc(Hons)(GU), PhD(GU), Director of Higher Degrees Research Training, Gnibi.
Cathy has been continuing her research career and teaching Honours students at Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples, Southern Cross University, since 2016. Cathy’s expertise is in the political economy of mining on Indigenous lands, resource management on Indigenous lands, Indigenous curriculum development, research methodologies, Native Title, and impact assessment.  She publishes widely and is currently a co researcher in two major Norwegian research projects with Sami colleagues at the Artic University in Tromso, Norway. These projects focus upon the comparative governance of resources on Indigenous lands across Norway, Sweden, Canada and Australia.

Karin Ness graduated from Southern Cross University with an LLB/BA (Hons) in 2000. Karin's BA comprised two years of study at the College of Indigenous Australian Peoples. Upon graduating Karin worked as a casual at the School of Law and Justice and in 2015 returned to Gnibi to teach in Human Rights and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander law related units. More recently Karin had the opportunity to co-teach in Indigenous World Views and Indigenous Scholarship and develop and practice the pedagogy that underpins the Indigenous Knowledge degree. 

Karin also works in community development and community legal education  at the Northern Rivers Community Legal Centre in Lismore. Karin's work builds access to justice opportunities for communities within the northern rivers region of NSW.

Dylan Berger was born in Coffs Harbour and is a Gumbaynggirr, Dhanggati, Yuin, and Biripai man. He has spent the past six years working with local schools, council bodies, and community organisations in a range of areas within the Gumbaynggirr footprint. This work began for Dylan in 2014 through engaging with local school teachers as a member of the 3rd space mob Cultural Cooperatives’ cultural awareness team. He then moved on to work as a mentor for Indigenous school students through the Student Leadership Initiative for Koori Kids (SLIKK) program and the Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME) where he currently remains a volunteer mentor. Dylan is an active community member participating in several events facilitated by the Local Shire and Aboriginal Lands Councils, local schools, Bellingen hospital, NDIS, and Southern Cross University. Over the past year and a half his work has involved events planning, community engagement, language development, and completing the Bachelor of Indigenous Knowledge with Honours degree. Dylan is also a valued Gnibi staff member.

Atalanta Lloyd-Haynes:  I am a woman of Aboriginal and European descent, mother of teenagers, a daughter and a sister. I am also a third year student in the Bachelor of Indigenous Knowledge course with Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples and a research intern with Committix Pty Ltd, an independent, Indigenous-owned research company.  I am currently preparing to take on the honours programme in 2021.


Creative Culture to Create a Culture

How might we create respectful and responsible futures?  Members of the Gnibi Principled Design team and Dream Bigger invite you to watch along, as we yarn up what it means to be ‘in this together’ as Indigenous creatives working to engage Indigenous Youth.

Creative Culture to Create a Culture:
Video podcast duration 59 minutes. Video link  

Participants:

Josh Creighton, Sheldon Harrington, Dhinawan Baker, Gnibi Principled Design Team
Blake (Teddy) Rhodes, Mitch King, Dream Bigger

Dhinawan Baker uses song, dance and storytelling to promote awareness and understanding about Indigenous Australia.  From children’s workshops, schools programs, corporate seminars, music festivals and private functions, audiences of all ages are captivated by his dynamic, straight from the heart, cultural commentary.  Winner of the Premier’s Encouragement Award for Education and Knowledge, Dhinawan’s presentations have made him a recognised name on the national and international stage. He’s an entertainer, from traditional dances and comedy shows to fire making and didgeridoo performances, Dhinawan has showcased his talents in private, public and commercial forums such as the NRL All Stars, Blues Fest and Splendour in the Grass to name a few. 

Blake Rhodes is a Lismore-based award winning rapper, producer and Creative arts & Culture Facilitator of the Dream Bigger Program. He is one part of award winning hip-hop trio Teddy Lewis King. Blake has written and performed across the country from The Back Alley Gallery in Lismore and Byron Bay Falls Festival to Deniliquin and the Sydney Opera House.

Mitch King is a Yaegl Bundjalung man from the Far North Coast region of NSW. He is a creative producer specialising in hip hop music and dance as well as working at NORPA as an Associate Artist and Creative arts & Culture Facilitator of the Dream Bigger Program. He is one part of local hip-hop group Teddy Lewis King and teaches dance with young people around the region. He has a background in youth work, collaborating with young people on community events and programs. Mitch combines his passion for hip-hop dance and music with theatre, movement and creative writing to connect with people who want to engage with the performing arts. As a workshop leader he develops people’s unique movement and voice within the rhythm and aesthetic of hip-hop.


For more information on National Reconciliation Week please refer to: National Reconciliation Week

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National Reconciliation Week

Date and time

From: 12:00 AM Wednesday, May 27, 2020 To: 12:00 PM Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Location