Research Students

Charly Moras

Charly Moras

t: +61-4-12 980 049
e: c.moras.10@student.scu.edu.au 

I undertook my Bachelor degree with Honours in marine biogeochemistry at CCB in 2018. I then started my PhD project in early 2020 focusing on Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement, a promising geoengineering strategy aiming to mitigate rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations related to climate change, as well as combat ocean acidification. My PhD project is in collaboration with researchers from the University of Tasmania (Hobart, Australia) and Nova Southeastern University of Davie (Florida, USA).

Research Profile 

Tori

Toribio Freije

t: 
e: t.freije.10@student.scu.edu.au 

I did my Bachelor degree in Environmental Sciences at the University of Buenos Aires. After that, I worked for almost three years in R&D on organic waste treatment, focusing on biogas and vermiculture techniques in the private sector in Australia. 

My Master’s degree focuses on applying hydrochar from abattoirs waste with silicate rocks as soil amendments to avoid carbon volatilisation. My work started by analysing and quantifying various forms of carbon through the silicated rocks- hydrochar system and their interactions in soils.

My plan for the future is to work with labelled carbon isotopes to understand their dynamics in more complex systems.

Research Profile

Mona Andskog

Mona Andskog

t: 
e: m.andskog.10@student.scu.edu.au 

I am a trained ecologist and a hobby biogeochemist, and I’m now combining these two passions of mine to study the effects of nutrients on carbon cycling in seagrass ecosystems as part of my PhD. In my masters in tropical marine ecology I investigated the effects of nutrients on the spectral properties of coral reef macroalgae in French Polynesia. After graduating I joined the Coastal Ecology and Conservation Lab at the University of Michigan, where I looked at how seagrass production responds to biogeochemical hotspots along an anthropogenic gradient in Haiti and the Bahamas. Most recently, I’ve quantified the contribution of sulphated polysaccharides to the dissolved organic carbon in brown macroalgae exudates. I’ve spent hundreds of hours diving for my work, and an equal amount with R, analysing my data using structural equation models and changepoint analyses for example.

Research Profile

Tijs Joling

Tijs Joling

t: 
e: t.joling.10@student.scu.edu.au 

I did both my BSc Biology and MSc Biological sciences (Limnology & Oceanography) at the University of Amsterdam. During my master I became interested in the use of stable isotope analysis for answering ecological questions. Another interest of mine is studying the effects humans have on the ecology of natural systems. My project at SCU’s Centre for Coastal Biogeochemistry will involve both of these interests.

During my PhD project I will be studying the nitrogen cycle in seagrass beds. Seagrass has an important function as a bioengineer and facilitates an important habitat for many species. Unfortunately, global seagrass cover is declining. One important cause of this decline is anthropogenic nutrient enrichment. In order to gain a better understanding of the effect of the seagrass bed enrichment I will conduct isotope labelling experiments. Cutting edge isotope analysis techniques will be used to study the fate of both inorganic and organic nitrogen compounds.

Research Profile

Micha

Micha Nebel

t: 
e: m.nebel.10@student.scu.edu.au 

Over the course of my Bachelor Thesis I began to specialize my skills in geo-ecology doing research on forest ecosystems. The main part of my work was to develop a new method for measuring the phosphorus uptake by the means of determining the isotopic composition of oxygen in the phosphate of xylem sap within young beech trees.

My Master Thesis is entitled “Forest floor contribution to the Phosphorus supply of adult beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) revealed by means of the oxygen isotope composition in xylem sap”. Building on my Bachelors work, this project aimed to quantify interactions between soil phosphorus availability and phosphorus nutrition strategies of European beech forests.

In my PhD project, I am going to focus on greenhouse gas emissions from intermittently wet and dry streams. This will include extensive fieldwork with sampling of water, soil, and sediment as well as respiration measurements. Furthermore, it will be accompanied by laboratory work with inter alia carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis.

Research Profile

Jasmine Haskell

Jasmine Haskell

t: 
e: j.haskell.11@student.scu.edu.au  

I am a PhD student at SCU with a background in oceanography and biochemistry. My project will aim to elucidate biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from corals under stress by implementing novel techniques for in-situ BVOC measurements. I am working with Dr. Liz Deschaseaux, Dr. Daniel Harrison and Prof. Bradley Eyre under the Reef Restoration and Adaptation Program.

Research Profile