How to reference a chapter in a book in APA 7th style (6:37)

Hi everyone, and welcome to this short video. Today we are going to talk about how to write a reference for a chapter in a book using APA 7th style.

As you may know, in APA7th style, ebooks are treated the same as print books – and to create your reference entry correctly, you’ll need the following elements:

“….the publisher name plus any applicable DOI or URL”

Notice that a publisher location is not included in APA 7th style.

So let’s take a look at what a reference entry for a chapter in a book looks like in APA 7th style.

So, here’s an example of the basic format for referencing a chapter in an edited book.

You can see that the first element is the chapter author names. Note that the names are inverted so that the last name comes first, followed by a comma and then the initials. Notice that there is a space between the initials and these are punctuated with a full stop. But notice that after the first author’s initial we have a full stop and a comma before the ampersand. The next element is the year of publication which is contained in round brackets and punctuated with a full stop.

Next, we have the title of the chapter. Notice that the title is in normal font, it is not italicised, and it’s in sentence case (which means that only the first letter of the first word is capitalised). And the chapter name ends with a full stop.

Now, the next element is the names of the editors. Here, we write the word “In” followed by the editor names. Notice that the editor names are not inverted, so the editors’ initials comes before their last name. The editor name is followed by an abbreviation of the word “Editors” which we can see has a capitalised “E” and a lower case “ds”. This information is punctuated with a full stop and contained in round brackets, which is followed immediately by a comma.

Next, we have the title of the whole book, which we can see is in italics. Now after the title, in round brackets, we have any edition information as well as the page range of the chapter. You can see that the edition information and the page rage is separated by a comma, and that the page rage is denoted by pp.

Then the next element is the name of the publisher, followed by a full stop, followed by the DOI or URL. Note that we don’t put a full stop after the DOI or URL.

So, here’s an example of a reference for a book.

You can see that the chapter author names are inverted, and that the initials are punctuated with a full stop. Notice the comma separating first author’s initial from the ampersand. The next element is the year of publication which is contained in round brackets and punctuated with a full stop.

Next, we have the title of the chapter. Notice that the title is in normal font and in sentence case and punctuated with a full stop.

Now, the next element is the name of the editor. We can see that the editor’s initial comes before the last name along with the word “In” (capitalised). The editor name is followed by an abbreviation of the word “Editor” which we can see has a capitalised “E”, a lower case “d”, and a full stop, which is contained within round brackets. This is followed by a comma.

Next, we have the title of the whole book, which we can see is in italics, and the page range which is contained in round brackets. Then the last element is the name of the publisher, followed by a full stop. We would include a DOI here if one was available.

Now, this book is from an academic research database, so we can end the reference after the publisher name; we don’t include the publisher location. But if we were citing a book that did not have a DOI and was not from an academic research database, then we would include a URL.

And just remember when constructing your reference list, the heading “references” should be in the centre and in bold. Your entries should be in alphabetical order based on the author surnames. Your entries should be doubled spaced, without extra spacing between, and should have a hanging indent. Lastly, make sure all works cited in-text are in your list and all entries in your list are cited in-text.

So now you now how to reference a chapter in a book in APA 7th style. If you want to know more about referencing, have a look at SCU’s online referencing guides – you can find a link to those guides on the library’s homepage – or ask your friendly Learning Experience Team – and good luck with your referencing!

Paraphrasing, citing in-text APA 7th style (4:14)

Hello and welcome to this short video on how to cite in-text by paraphrasing in APA 7th referencing style.

This video will cover the methods used to paraphrase. examples of these and some final points to remember. Now there are two ways if we want to reference a paraphrase in text using APA 7th referencing style.

These are author focused and information focused and we're going to look at both of these today.

Firstly if we look at author focused what happens is the author's name or names if there are multiple authors appear outside of the brackets usually in these types of citations the author will appear at the beginning or in the middle of the sentence and we use this method if we want to draw particular attention to the author that we have referenced.

Let's have a look at some examples. Here is the original text written by Smith and we can see it says;

Students often find referencing in the main text of their work a little difficult to understand and do correctly.

So we want to use that idea but obviously we have to paraphrase it into our own words and then reference Smith.

So the first method shows that the author starts the sentence Smith in brackets (2012) argued that in-text citations could be a little confusing.

That is one way to achieve that paraphrase the second example we have added the reporting verb first so according to Smith (2012), in brackets again and then a comma in-text citations could be a little confusing.

And now the final example has moved the author further into the middle of the sentence;

In-text citations can be quite confusing as Smith (2012) pointed out in a recent study.

So all three of these are equally valid but. Just notice that Smith appears outside of the brackets in each case.

Now if we move on to information focus style paraphrasing in this case the author's name or names appear inside the brackets this type of citation will often appear in the middle or at the end of the sentence and unlike author focus referencing this is what we use if we want to draw attention to the actual information itself.

So here are some examples of how we would use information focus referencing again we have the original text (written by Smith) Students often find referencing in the main text of their work a little difficult to understand and do correctly.

So that's the idea we want to use so we need to paraphrase it and reference Smith so in the first example you can see that the author now appears at the end of the reference;

It has been argued that in-text citations could be a little confusing (Smith, 2012).

An important feature of APA 7th referencing is that the comma always appears between the author or authors and the year so it's important not to leave that small detail out.

A second example shows the author appearing in the middle of the sentence in-text citations can be a little confusing.

There's the paraphrase (Smith, 2012), in brackets and then we have added our own comment to that and this poses a major challenge for students.

So if the author and the information prominent are suitable methods to paraphrase.

The important thing to remember with paraphrasing however as we've seen in those examples is keeping the original meaning of the idea and words we want to use but putting them into our own words.

That is the crucial point, that is how we avoid plagiarism. The other thing to remember now that we have both of these styles is that using a combination of these can also help vary your writing.

So instead of just using one author first or information first and having repetitive writing, try mixing it up a little to give it that variety.

And that will bring us to the end of this video.

We hope that it's been helpful to you and good luck with all of your referencing.

Referencing websites in APA 7th style (4:11)

Hello and welcome to this short video on how to reference websites in APA 7th.

To do this we'll need some specific pieces of information.

We'll need the author or authors this can be an individual or it can be an organization referred to as a group author. Next we'll need the date of publication or the latest update we'll need the title of the website and the title of the webpage or document found on the web page.

The format for the reference will differ slightly depending on whether it's individual or a group author. This format is found on the APA 7th libguide. Just note the url link should be live so the reader can click on it and go directly to the page and we want to use the most specific date possible for our reference entries.

So let's have a look at some examples.

First, we'll look at a web page with an individual author then we'll look at a web page with a group author. So here we have a generic web page, the individual who authored this page is here and the date of publication is below that. The title of the page is here nice and clearly and the title of the website is here. Lastly the url can be found here.

So, I've compiled that information.

The next step is to match the APA 7th formatting. So, this is the formatting from the APA 7th libguide and as you can see this entry matches it perfectly. We have the author's surname, Darling, a comma followed by the first initial b and a full stop. Next we have the year of publication in brackets and remember to use the most specific date which is June 1st 2020. Followed by another full stop.

Next the webpage title is in italics with another full stop followed by the website title, Urban List and another full stop before the url. So, let's have a look at a group author example now.

Here is a web page by the world health organization because there is no individual author listed we are going to use the group author which is usually found here.

You can see the date of publication here and the title of the web page.

Lastly we have the url here so again I've compiled this information now let's have a look at the libguide formatting.

So, this again is straight from your libguide and this is what the entry looks like when you match that formatting as you can see we have the group author world health organization full stop the specific date of publication or last update in brackets and another full stop. We have the title in italics followed by a full stop and because the name of the website is the same as the group name we don't need to include that here. Lastly because this information may change as the world health organization undertakes more research. I've included the retrieval date in the form of retrieved August 31st 2020 from and the url.

So that's what the entry looks like when you follow the APA 7 format.

Now let's look at what that looks like in the reference list. Here are our two entries in alphabetical order, double spacing with a hanging indent. Note you can use ctrl t or command t to quickly get the hanging indent.

Lastly as a reminder make sure your heading references is centred and bold, make sure your entries are in alphabetical order by the surname, use double spacing without adding any extra spaces between entries and don't forget to check and make sure you've included all the sources cited in text.

So we hope this video has been useful. Happy referencing.

Quotations, citing in-text APA 7th (5:29)

Hello and welcome to this short video on how to cite in text using direct quotations in APA 7th referencing style.

This video will cover the methods used to quote in text some examples of these and some final points to remember. The rules for quoting revolve around the length of the quote for quotes less than 40 words they should be included in the main sentence in the text. However if your quote is more than 40 words they should be presented in block format and indented without quotation marks.

We'll look at examples of both of these. So firstly we have the author focus style of direct quotes Here the author's name or names if there are multiple authors appear outside of the brackets Usually this type of citation occurs at the beginning or the middle of the sentence and we use it if we want to draw particular attention to the author we are using.

So here are some examples of this using a short quote our original text written by Jones is that students often find getting the reference list exactly correct quite difficult.

We're going to use that quote word for word but in three examples just have a look at the different position of the author's name. In the first one Jones is outside of the brackets as we said then 2017 a comma and the p there represents page number and we need a page number when we are direct quoting in APA 7 style.

In the second one you can see something has changed the reporting verb in this case according to comes before the author and then the quote occurs and finally we have an introduction to the idea. Many students experience great difficulty in. And then using the part of the quote that we want. As Jones 2017 page seven pointed out in a recent study. These are all variations of doing the same thing with direct quotes.

Now let's have a look at an author focused example with a longer quote so as we said earlier if a direct quote is for is longer than 40 words it has to be presented in a different style. We have the original text this time written by two authors now if we look at the quote you can see that it has been presented in a different way.

So according to McRudden and Ross notice that both the authors appear outside of the brackets and notice that we use the actual word and a and d to refer to them.

Then we have the brackets 2017 and the page number which is what is required for direct quotes. In this case however we don't use any quotation marks it has been indented into a block as you can see there. Now if I move away from author focused I can also introduce a quote with information focus in this case the author's name or names appear inside the brackets. We usually find this type of quotation in the middle or end of the sentence and we use it when we want to draw attention to the actual information itself rather than the author.

So an example might look like this. Again here is the original short text which i'll use in my quote that is under 40 words students often find getting the reference list exactly correct quite difficult.

Okay so this is how it might look it has been argued that and now I have the direct quote. Students often find getting the references exactly correct quite difficult followed by the citation in brackets Jones comma 2017 comma p.7 for page seven. A couple of things to notice here. Notice that it's a double quotation mark that we use in APA 7 style which is important to remember.

The other thing to notice is that the author is inside the brackets with the year this time and notice that there is a comma between the two again this is an important part of APA referencing that can't be overlooked.

The final thing I want to draw your attention to here is notice in our original text that was the start of a sentence now we have changed the capital S to a lowercase s to fit grammatically in our sentence because we have started it with. It has been argued that which is what you should be doing when you're using direct quotes in your work.

So here is an example of an information focused long quote again over 40 words so it is widely known that and we have used the same text as last time but instead of having the authors at the beginning you can now see that the authors appear at the end of the reference there notice that both authors appear in the brackets with the year and notice what's happened to the end once the end appears inside the brackets. It changes to the symbol if the authors are outside of the brackets we use the actual word and also notice there is a comma between the authors and the year and we also have the page number again.

So that brings us to the end of our short video on quotations remember to use those different styles to add variation to your work and we hope this has been helpful.

Good luck with all your referencing.