Sustainability, Environment and Education (SEE) Research Cluster

About us

The School of Education 'Sustainability, Environment and Education' (SEE) Research Cluster, led by Professor Amy Cutter-Mackenzie, was established in 2012. The Cluster is making substantial progress in research across and within the areas of sustainability, environment and education. SEE is comprised of Southern Cross University staff and academics, external academics and higher degree research students. The Cluster is engaged in research, policy and practice in the broader fields of environmental education, sustainability education and interdisciplinary fields (including health, geography, science and technology, art and indigenous education). Members of the Cluster have won ARC funding, considerable government and non-government research income; published in high-impact and field-significant publications; and elected editorial roles in internationally significant and high impact journals in sustainability, environment and education. 

The explicit research priorities or themes of SEE are:

  1. Environmental and sustainability education policy, curriculum and practice from early childhood through to higher education
  2. Climate change education, risk and research
  3. Societal transformation via socio-ecological transdisciplinary and posthumantist theories
  4. Art, place, cultural and indigenous responses to sustainability
  5. Health and wellbeing.

SEE Researchers Lead Major International Reference Handbook on ChildhoodNature

This major reference handbook is unique and innovative in that it brings together existing research themes and seminal authors in the ChildhoodNature field alongside new cutting edge research authored by world class researchers drawing on cross cultural and international research data. The use of the new concept "ChildhoodNature" (coined by Cutter-Mackenzie, Malone & Barratt Hacking) reflects the editors' underpinning belief, and the latest innovative concepts in the field, that as children are nature this should be redefined in this integrating concept. The book therefore critiques and rejects an anthropocentric view of nature. As such it disrupts existing ways of considering children and nature and rejects the view that humans are superior to nature.

Events

Urban Spaces Keynote Series

This three part keynote series on Urban Spaces is being led by the Sustainability, Environment & Education (SEE) Research Cluster.   The keynote speakers are: 

19 October: Dr Natalie Osborne (Griffith University) - Radial and Insurgent critical urban human geography. Register at https://urbanspaceskeynoteseriesnatalieosbourne.eventbrite.com.au

14 November: Dr Jessica McLean (Macquarie University) - Can we love our digital monsters? More-than-real geographies in the Anthropocene. Register at https://urbanspaceskeynoteseriesjessicamclean.eventbrite.com.au

11 December: Professor Karen Malone (Western Sydney University) -  Educating Children in the Urban  Anthropocene. Register at https://urbanspaceskeynoteserieskarenmalone.eventbrite.com.au

Past Events

  • Research Week 2017 Speed dating event Event details
  • Research dialogue 18 July 2017 Event flyer
  • The Climate Change Challenge was a unique opportunity for children and young people to participate in a child-centred learning fair with many activities lef by children and young people.
  • Our Voice: Sustainability Conference for Young People by Young People

 

Recent research projects

CC + ME is a project that empowers children and young people in Northern NSW to engage in climate change research and action. We want to learn about and develop the awareness, attitudes and actions of children and young people towards climate change. Visit the CC + ME website to find out more.

Cubewalk is a network of interactive public artworks which have been installed across the Lismore campus of Southern Cross University. Cubewalk draws on the natural and cultural dimensions of the campus to create spaces for engaging with sustainability as a dynamic process of social and ecological change.

NatureCollective - is 'nature' diminshing in childhood? Research increasingly shows a serious decline in human interactions and experience in nature. There is speculation that the impact of not experiencing nature is severe and has been referred to as 'nature-deficit' disorder. This study aims to understand the extent of this phenomenon from the perspective of children and young people across different cultural contexts.

News and recent grant successes

Connecting with SEE