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SCU Scholarship of Learning and Teaching Symposium 2019 banner text with lineart logo of a colourful  lightbulb figure sitting at a laptop with a headset on communicating online

Parallel Session Abstracts

11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

Representing context & place in online learning: A design case study

Investigating synchronous and asynchronous class attendance as predictors of academic success in online learning

Teacher presence and modelling: Strategies for increasing student satisfaction in large online units

Using Qualtrix survey data to improve stakeholder engagement in an online internship program

TV for teaching: Enrich your pedagogy with embeddable and interactive educational content

Using short-form video cartoon to develop complex clinical skill

Numeracy Ready Project

Using a narrative for online learning

Supporting critical reflection in an online environment

Online learning education: A review of reviews

The digital age: A scoping review of nursing students’ perceptions of the use of online discussion boards

Using WeChat for online language learning in China

1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

Case/Problem-based learning in the Master of Osteopathic Medicine: Reflections on 10 years of delivery

Engaging students in online collaboration through group wiki assessment

Andragogy – engaging adult learners – online teaching trends & experiences

Evaluating online student engagement: Examples of good practice from the UK’s Open University

Creating presence through rich sensory online environment

The potential benefits of using guided notes in online lectures

Co-creating quality learning experiences with individuals in blended and online learning environments: An example

Creating quality online interprofessional learning experiences

Blending online career development and employability skills content within a Nursing curriculum

What it takes to be an online teacher

Effectively delivering library classes to the masses: The challenge of converting face-to-face to online

If you thought face-to-face teaching was a challenge try teaching remote online

11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

C1.05 – 11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

Representing context & place in online learning: A design case study

Dr Lachlan Forsyth, Centre for Teaching and Learning
Presented in room C1.05, 11am-12pm Qld

The value of supporting student learning through the provision of contextual, situated learning experiences is well established and deeply theorised (e.g. Lave & Wenger, 1991; Brown, Collins, & Duguid, 1989; Dewey, 1963). Providing rich, authentic contexts through which students can solve problems, apply principles and practise professional behaviours is an effective way to promote engagement and deepen learning (Laurillard, 2012). Yet, despite this recognition, establishing productive contextual and place-based learning opportunities for online university students can be a challenge, both conceptually and logistically. This is especially the case when development resources and time are limited. One response to this challenge is to maintain a clear focus on learning design in order to distil the necessary components for supporting student learning and engagement (Violante, Vezzetti & Piazzolla, 2019; Cochrane et al, 2017). Through a small case study that includes a virtual site-visit, we explore how learning design can assist in establishing rich, contextual learning environments for online students. Rather than focusing on high-tech development and sophisticated immersive platforms, we will discuss some important elements that can be considered when distilling an effective context-rich learning design, including cognitive, social and work-integrated dimensions. Participants are encouraged to share their own experiences, issues and questions related to the design of context-rich online learning environments.

Brown, J. S., Collins, A., & Duguid, P. (1989). Situated cognition and the culture of learning. Educational Researcher, 18, 34–41.

Cochrane, T., Cook, S., Aiello, S., Christie, D., Sinfield, D. Steagall, M., & Aguayo, C. (2017). A DBR framework for designing mobile virtual reality learning environments. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 33(6).

Dewey, J. (1963). Experience & education. New York: Collier MacMillan.

Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. New York: Cambridge University
Press.

Laurillard, D. (2012). Teaching as a design science. New York: Routledge.

Violante, M. G., Vezzetti, E., & Piazzolla, P. (2019). Interactive virtual technologies in engineering education: Why not 360° videos? International Journal on Interactive Design and Manufacturing, 13(2).  

C1.05 – 11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

Investigating synchronous and asynchronous class attendance as predictors of academic success in online learning

Dr Johanna Nieuwoudt, SCU College
Presented in room C1.05, 11am-12pm Qld

Learning is facilitated by participation and interaction, and can be synchronously or asynchronously in online learning. This current study investigated the relationship between students’ academic success and online interaction and participation, and explored their class attendance (synchronous virtual classes and/or watching the recorded virtual classes) in the online study mode of the Preparing for Success Program. The data were retrieved from usage information data provided by the Blackboard Learn learning management system. The results show that it is important for students to attend class, but it does not necessarily make a difference whether students attend synchronous virtual classes or watch the recordings of the virtual classes. A significant relationship was found between academic success and the number of hours students participated and interacted in the online learning system. Academic success may be increased by providing various options for students to participate and interact online, and to attend classes synchronously or asynchronously. The flexibility of online education can enable students to be successful in their studies. Through the effective design of the learning environment, flexibility can be increased by providing choice and control.

Davies, J., & Graff, M. (2005). Performance in e-learning: Online participation and student grades. British Journal of Educational Technology, 36(4), 657–663. doi:10.111/j.1467-8535.2005.00542.x

Hrastinski, S. (2009). A theory of online learning as online participation. Computers & Education, 52(1), 78–82. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2008.06.009

McBrien, J. L., Jones, P. T., & Cheng, R. (2009). Virtual spaces: Employing a synchronous online classroom to facilitate student engagement in online learning. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 10(3). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v10i3.605

Nieuwoudt, J. E. (2018). Exploring online interaction and online learner participation in an online science subject through the lens of the interaction equivalence theorem. Student Success, 9(2), 1–10. https://doi.org/10.5204/ssj.v10i1.424

Offir, B., Lev, Y., & Bezalel, R. (2008). Surface and deep learning processes in distance education: Synchronous versus asynchronous systems. Computers & Education, 51(3), 1172–1183. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2007.10.009

Perera, L., & Richardson, P. (2010). Students' use of online academic resources within a course web site and its relationship with their course performance: An exploratory study. Accounting Education, 19(6), 587–600. https://doi.org/10.1080/09639284.2010.529639

Skylar, A. A. (2009). A comparison of asynchronous online text-based lectures and synchronous interactive web conferencing lectures. Issues in Teacher Education, 18(2), 69–84. Retrieved from https://www.itejournal.org/

Wong, L. (2013). Student engagement with online resources and its impact on learning outcomes. Journal of Information Technology Education: Innovations in Practice, 12, 129–146. Retrieved from https://www.informingscience.org/Journals/JITEIIP/Overview

C1.05 – 11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

Teacher presence and modelling: Strategies for increasing student satisfaction in large online units

Liz Goode, SCU College
Presented in room C1.05, 11am-12pm Qld

Teacher presence, or the “visibility” of a teacher in an online course or unit, is advocated as a critical aspect of engaging, supporting and retaining students in online learning environments (Baker, 2010; Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 1999; Lynch, 2016; Stone, 2017). This aspect of course delivery is particularly crucial for learners who are new to higher education and unfamiliar with academic discourses and conventions. Yet, the effects of improving teacher presence in units with diverse, “non-traditional” student cohorts requires ongoing investigation (Signor & Moore, 2014). The purpose of this presentation is therefore twofold: to demonstrate practical techniques for enhancing online teacher presence; and to highlight the resultant gains in student satisfaction observed in two large, online units delivered through SCU's Preparing for Success Program (PSP). Drawing on Hellmundt and Baker’s (2017) GEMS model for enhancing student engagement, and Salmon’s (2011) e-moderating model for facilitating online discussion, the unit assessor for these units implemented an array of techniques designed to ‘humanise’ the teacher and clarify assessment expectations. These strategies included: short video messages; interactive methods in Collaborate tutorials; deliberate use of warm and approachable language alongside images designed to encourage and inspire; and discussion summarising techniques. Additionally, assessment tasks were repeatedly modelled for students in online tutorials and unit discussion boards. The overarching aim of these techniques was to achieve a teacher presence that was “obvious, supportive, encouraging and professional” (Stone, 2017, p. 8), while providing guidance appropriate for adult learners. A notable improvement to student satisfaction was subsequently observed in both units, illustrating the positive effects that can result from enhancing teacher presence in units with diverse student cohorts.

Baker, C. (2010). The impact of instructor immediacy and presence for online student affective learning, cognition, and motivation. Journal of Educators Online, 7, 1–30. Retrieved from http://www.thejeo.com

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (1999). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2–3), 87–105. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1096-7516(00)00016-6

Hellmundt, S., & Baker, D. (2017). Encouraging engagement in enabling programs: The students’ perspective. Student Success, 8(1), 25–33. https://doi.org/10.5204/ssj.v8i1.357

Lynch, J. (2016). Teaching presence. Pearson Higher Education Services White Paper. Retrieved from https://www.pearson.com/content/dam/one-dot-com/one-dot-com/us/en/pearson-ed/downloads/Teaching-Presence.pdf

Salmon, G. (2011). E-moderating: The key to teaching and learning online (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.

Signor, L., & Moore, C. (2014). Open access in higher education – strategies for engaging diverse student cohorts. Open Praxis, 6(3), 305–313. http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/openpraxis.6.3.132

Stone, C. (2017). Opportunity through online learning: Improving student access, participation and success in higher education. Retrieved from https://www.ncsehe.edu.au/publications/opportunity-online-learning-improving-student-access-participation-success-higher-education/

C4.14 – 11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

Using Qualtrix survey data to improve stakeholder engagement in an online internship program

Dr Sharen Nisbet, Dr John Haw and Julia Caldicott, School of Business and Tourism
Presented in room C4.14, 11am-12pm Qld

Placement evaluations are a commonly used assessment and feedback tool in Work Integrated Learning (WIL). These are typically completed by the student’s workplace supervisor, and consider attainment on a range of skill- and competency-based measures (Ferns & Moore, 2012; Jackson, 2018a, 2018b; McNamara, 2013; Milne & Caldicott, 2016). These evaluations can be used as an assurance of learning tool, allow mapping of graduate outcomes, and can lead to program changes consistent with this feedback (Whelan, 2017).
The business and tourism WIL program includes a minimum 225 hour and maximum 450 hour capstone work placement during which students complete a range of assessments, all completed and delivered online.  Assessments include goal setting, progress reporting, and an evaluation of workplace practices in the context of the theories studied. For the last several years students have also completed a performance self-assessment that is near-identical to the one completed by their workplace supervisors at the conclusion of the placement.  This evaluation is aligned with three of Southern Cross University’s six graduate attributes: knowledge of a discipline, lifelong learning, and communication and social skills.
We hope that this process helps students make sense of their placement experience and formulate a plan for the future. We wish, however, to test this idea and perhaps develop the utility of this online assessment practice. The first step is to understand and minimise some of the issues that have been identified in the literature as problematic, and around which we have ongoing concerns. 
Issues that have been identified include that stakeholders have differing expectations around the purpose, measures and outcomes associated with student evaluations (Ferns, 2012; Smith, 2014); the role of the supervisor delivering the feedback is often not well understood (Peach, Ruinard & Webb, 2014); and when poorly done there is little value-add (Hodges, Smith & Jones, 2004 – see Peach et al.).
Significantly for this study, further research to address these issues has been especially encouraged in the context of business placements (Richardson, Jackling, Henschke & Tempone, 2013). 
This presentation, then, will overview our current online assessment processes.  It will then present some preliminary findings from our comparison of more than 200 paired student and supervisor performance evaluations. Discussion will seek to engage the audience in some preliminary sense-making.

Billett, S. (2015). Integrating practice-based experiences into higher education. Dordrecht: Springer.

Ferns, S. (2012). Graduate employability: Teaching staff, employer and graduate perceptions. Paper presented at the Collaborative education: investing in the future conference, Geelong.

Ferns, S., & Moore, K. (2012). Assessing student outcomes in field work placements: An overview of current practice. Asia-Pacific Journal of Cooperative Education, 13(4), 207–224.

Gonsalvez, C. J., & Freestone, J. (2007). Field supervisors’ assessments of trainee performance: Are they reliable and valid? Australian Psychologist, 42(1), 23–32.

Jackson, D. (2018a). Challenges and strategies for assessing student workplace performance during work-integrated learning. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 43(4), 555–570. doi:10.1080/02602938.2017.1378618

Jackson, D. (2018b). Students’ and their supervisors’ evaluations on professional identity in work placements. Vocations and Learning. doi:10.1007/s12186-018-9207-1

Jiang, Y. H., Lee, S. W. Y., & Golab, L. (2015). Analyzing student and employer satisfaction with cooperative education through multiple data sources. Asia-Pacific Journal of Cooperative Education, 16(4), 225–240.

McNamara, J. (2013). The challenge of assessing professional competence in work integrated learning. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 38(2), 183–197.

Milne, L., & Caldicott, J. (2016). Exploring differences in industry supervisors' ratings of student performance on WIL placements and the relative importance of skills: Does remuneration matter? Asia-Pacific Journal of Cooperative Education, 17(2), 175–186.

Peach, D., Ruinard, E., & Webb, F. (2014). Feedback on student performance in the workplace. Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 15(3), 241–252.

Richardson, J., Jackling, B., Henschke, K., & Tempone, I. (2013). Developing a collaborative model of industry feedback for work placement business students. Asia-Pacific Journal of Cooperative Education, 14(1), 28–43.

Smith, C. (2014). Assessment of student outcomes from work-integrated learning: Validity and reliability. Asia-Pacific Journal of Cooperative Education, 15(3), 209–223.

Whelan, M. (2017). Road testing graduate attributes and course learning outcomes of an environmental science degree via a work-integrated learning placement. Asia-Pacific Journal of Cooperative Education, 18(1), 1–13.

C4.14 – 11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

TV for teaching: Enrich your pedagogy with embeddable and interactive educational content

Carlie Nekrasov, Library Services
Diane Russ, School of Health and Human Sciences

Presented in room C4.14, 11am-12pm Qld

ClickView is a database subscribed to by the library that provides access to the off-air recordings of Australian and global television content via on-demand video streaming.
This content is copyright-cleared for educational use and can be embedded into online learning platforms, such as Blackboard, and made available via curated collections linked to particular disciplines and subjects.
The video streaming database enables you to add interactive elements to recorded programs, such as quizzes, that can be used as formative assessment opportunities. These kinds of tools are “unleashing ‘adaptive learning’ approaches that are invigorating traditional pedagogies” (Maher & Elkington, 2015).
There are great benefits in embedding online and interactive educational content, including the potential to accelerate leaps in learning (Patchan, Schunn, Sieg & Mclaughlin, 2016).

Maher, S., & Elkington, R. (2015). Re-thinking ancillary: Australian screen content in education. Studies in Australasian Cinema, 9(2), 152–170. https://doi.org/10.1080/17503175.2015.1055876

Patchan, M., Schunn, C., Sieg, W., & Mclaughlin, D. (2016). The effect of blended instruction on accelerated learning. Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 25(3), 269–286. https://doi.org/10.1080/1475939X.2015.1013977

C4.14 – 11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

Using short-form video cartoon to develop complex clinical skill

Elicia Kunst, School of Health and Human Sciences
Presented in room C4.14, 11am-12pm Qld

Time in clinical practice settings for undergraduate nursing students comes at a premium. A range of factors impact student learning in clinical practice labs, including increased student numbers, resource limitations, and limited face-to-face time to address a broad curriculum. The productivity of ‘hands-on time’ needs to be maximised. Students need to be well-prepared before lab classes to enable them to engage fully and develop comprehensive understanding of complex clinical tasks. However, time-poor students don’t necessarily engage with pre-readings and online lectures, leaving them underprepared to make the most of their time in the clinical lab.
In this presentation I will unpack the use of a short animation video which was developed to provide students with a range of tools to develop competence to undertake a complex medication administration task using a safe and systematic method. The video breaks down each step of the preparation process, which includes evidence-based practice, knowledge of pharmacokinetics and pharmacotherapy, compliance with quality and safety policy, advanced medication calculation and patient assessment, in a short 2 min 30 sec timeframe. Used in conjunction with podcast lectures and readings, this video aims to help students develop clinical knowledge and skill for implementation in a complex clinical simulation scenario.

C4.15 – 11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

Numeracy Ready Project

Dr Jenelle Benson, Centre for Teaching and Learning
Marty Williams, Library Services
Dr Mieke Witsel, School of Business and Tourism

Presented in room C4.15, 11am-12pm Qld

Numeracy proficiency among Australian students has been dropping (ARACY, 2015), with Australia now ranking 19th in the list of 50 countries who partake in the international Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), lower than all other English-speaking countries apart from New Zealand. In a seminal study linking numeracy to academic retention, Parsons and Bynner (2005) found low numeracy to be more problematic than low literacy with regard to successfully undertaking tertiary studies, with resultant implications for student retention. The School of Business and Tourism has seen falling student success rates and increased attrition among quantitative units.
To improve foundation mathematics skills and thus positively enhance student success rates and student confidence, the Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) in collaboration with the library and the School of Business and Tourism (SBaT) have created Numeracy Ready modules that are student-centred, just-in-time learning for students who are missing foundation mathematic skills needed to succeed in their current units. Students are encouraged to use these learning modules to engage in mathematic content through activities that then allow for evaluation and remediation. Students in SBaT take an online quiz embedded in their unit and then receive results and feedback as to which modules they need to undertake to improve their foundation mathematics skills. The Numeracy Ready modules are designed to have a small amount of front-loaded content to improve engagement. The majority of the learning takes place through an interactive video where the teacher practises the skills using similar problems found in the evaluation area. The students then practise the skills and if they are still having problems the students are directed to additional resources to help them learn the concept. The learning modules have been developed to support students across multiple SBaT units by CTL and the Library using the LibWiz tool, videos and evaluative questions.

ARACY. (2018). Report Card: The Wellbeing of Young Australians. Retrieved from https://www.aracy.org.au/shop/publications/report-card-the-wellbeing-of-young-australians

Mullis, I. V. S., & Martin, M. O. (Eds.). (2017). TIMSS 2019 Assessment Frameworks. Retrieved from http://timssandpirls.bc.edu/timss2019/frameworks/

Parsons, S., & Bynner, J. (2005). Does numeracy matter more? London: Institute of Education.

C4.15 – 11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

Using a narrative for online learning

Gretel Jones, School of Health and Human Sciences
Presented in room C4.15, 11am-12pm Qld

Using an online platform for delivery of a narrative around Aboriginal health, this learning resource engages the student to understand the link of health and culture. The student is led in a process of enquiry from a first person view. A problem is highlighted and the student follows evidence-based resources that deepens their understanding of Aboriginal health, culture and culturally competent practice for the health professional. This resource is a pilot and may be adapted – either as stand-alone module-based learning or expanded in more detail to replace weekly Blackboard content. Articulate 360 is the software used where SCU holds a limited number of licences. The software offers options to create chunked learning activities in order that the student is continuously and actively involved throughout the story. Assessment of content in line with university requirements needs to be performed independently as the software does not allow for this.

C4.15 – 11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

Supporting critical reflection in an online environment

Clarissa Hitchcock and Dr Louise Whitaker, School of Arts and Social Sciences
Presented in room C4.15, 11am-12pm Qld

Social welfare workers are called upon to practice in increasingly complex human service environments; maintaining resilience in demanding emotional situations (Kinman & Grant, 2017). Scaffolding critical reflection throughout the Bachelor of Social Welfare curricula goes some way to prepare future practitioners to thrive in these emotionally complex environments. Issues of Protection is an advanced level unit exploring issues of child abuse and neglect, violence and trauma.  In preparing students to work in the field of child protection, the unit exposes them to research, knowledge and case studies which are complex, intellectually and emotionally demanding and invites them to critically reflect on their responses.  Students, particularly those who are online, have reported being distressed and challenged by the unit material. Yet, they need to be exposed to it to develop the skills and knowledge to work in this complex field of practice.  In this presentation we will discuss changes introduced following a recent peer review of the curricula. Assessment tasks were revised, online workshops were introduced and weekly lectures were pre-recorded. After introducing this suite of changes, unit staff have noticed a marked improvement in both student satisfaction and the quality of student assignments. We welcome this opportunity to reflect on the factors that have contributed to this success.

Kinman, G., & Grant, L. (2017). Building resilience in early-career social workers: Evaluating a multi-modal intervention. British Journal of Social Work, 47(7), 1979–1998. doi:10.1093/bjsw/bcw164

C4.16 – 11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

Online learning education: A review of reviews

Dr Nasim Salehi, School of Health and Human Sciences
Dr Zahra Karimian, Virtual School and Center of Excellence in e-Learning, Shiraz University of Medical
Science, Iran
Dr Ali Reza Alaei, School of Business and Tourism
Associate Professor Sally Sargeant, School of Health and Human Sciences

Presented in room C4.16, 11am-12pm

Background
Although online educational platforms have been used increasingly, there is lack of evidence-based guidance around what to offer online and how. There are also great variations in learning designs and delivery. This review of reviews aims to provide a comprehensive perspective around online learning modes, and their effectiveness across different disciplines.
Method
A review of reviews was conducted, including all the review papers around any online learning programs used in any disciplines across any levels (undergraduate and postgraduate). Thematic analysis was used for data synthesis. 
Findings
Preliminary analysis resulted in five key themes: 1) Delivery modes/platforms need to be matched based on the learners’ needs, to result in meaningful interaction. Internet-based programs need to be effective and efficient (useful, convenient, engaging and affordable). 2) A holistic support system needs to be available for students around academic and technology-related issues, sense of community, and their health and wellbeing. Students should be assisted to improve Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) strategies, such as time management, problem solving/critical thinking, metacognition, and effort regulation. 3) Competency of educators need to be assessed and updated regularly, based on pedagogy, technology, communication skills, expertise, incorporating leadership theories (such as situational), change management, creativity, and evidence-based teaching. 4) Although online and traditional education courses showed relatively similar learning outcome and satisfaction, online education, was suggested due to the higher demand around flexibility. 5) Although 15-week versus 7-week online courses showed relatively similar learning outcome and satisfaction, online intensive courses were recommended due to the flexibility and more frequent intake periods.
Conclusion
Online education provides great flexibility, variation, and cost-efficiency, however, it is essential to assure that the online learning mode is appropriate based on the learners’ needs and priorities. 

Broadbent, J., & Poon, W. L. (2015). Self-regulated learning strategies & academic achievement in online higher education learning environments: A systematic review. The Internet and Higher Education, 27, 1–13.

Roddy, C., Amiet, D. L., Chung, J., Holt, C., Shaw, L., McKenzie, S., ... & Mundy, M. E. (2017). Applying best practice online learning, teaching, and support to intensive online environments: An integrative review. Frontiers in Education, 2, 59

Zhao, F., Fu, Y., Zhang, Q. J., Zhou, Y., Ge, P. F., Huang, H. X., & He, Y. (2018). The comparison of teaching efficiency between massive open online courses and traditional courses in medicine education: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Annals of translational medicine, 6(23).

C4.16 – 11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

The digital age: A scoping review of nursing students’ perceptions of the use of online discussion boards

Associate Professor Deb Massey, School of Health and Human Sciences
Presented in room C4.16, 11am-12pm Qld

To address institutional, staff and student needs, and embrace the digital world, university courses are utilising more online teaching platforms and embedded online tools. One such online tool, which allows for information sharing, the development of critical thinking and literature skills, and fostering interactions and networking, is the online discussion board. Online discussion boards can engage and educate students, and can be used as a potential platform through which to assess knowledge and understanding.

Although discussion boards are increasingly used in nursing there is limited understanding of how undergraduate students interact with these learning resources. This scoping review was conducted to explore undergraduate nursing students’ perceptions of online discussion boards. Using the Arksey and O'Malley's methodological framework, seven studies were identified, with different methodological paradigms and different outcomes. Results from these studies suggest that online discussion boards can be used to promote engagement, including enhancing learning and interactions; however, discussion boards can also promote student disengagement. Undergraduate student nurses may lack the technical skills to use discussion boards effectively or may reject them in preference for more traditional teaching and learning strategies. Enhancing undergraduate student nurses’ familiarity, and understanding of discussion boards is important to their success. Future research needs to explore how discussion boards contribute to teaching and learning and learner engagement in the undergraduate nursing curriculum.

C4.16 – 11am to 12pm Parallel Sessions

Using WeChat for online language learning in China

Sharon Leslie, SCU College
Presented in room C4.16, 11am-12pm Qld

Direct Entry Programs (DEPs) for international students have become an increasingly prominent feature of the Australian tertiary education landscape over the past two decades, and are offered at all 43 of Australia’s universities. SCU College offers a face-to-face direct entry English for Academic Purposes (EAP) unit at three levels, enabling successful EAP graduands to enter diploma, undergraduate and post-graduate programs at Southern Cross University, depending on their past educational qualifications and level of English proficiency. EAP units focus on both the development of overall English proficiency and of the academic literacies and skills that students need to succeed in an English-medium university (Klimova, 2015; Wette, 2014; Dooey, 2010; Agosti & Bernat, 2009). Increasingly, international students from offshore institutional partners are looking for opportunities to develop their proficiency and skills pre-arrival. This presents opportunities for SCU College to use the online environment to meet these needs, while also beginning the process of ‘academic discourse socialization’ (Duff, 2007, p. 01.3). This presentation outlines the first stages of the development of an online semester-long program for Dalian University in Dalian, China, using Zoom and WeChat, and focussing on academic listening skills. It explores the challenges and opportunities in creating and delivering engaging online content to students learning English in China.

Agosti, C., & Bernat, E. (2009). Teaching direct entry programs effectively: Insights for ELICOS teachers and managers. English Australia Journal, 25(1), 27.

Dooey, P. (2010). Students’ perspectives of an EAP pathway program. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 9, 184–197. doi:10.1016/j.jeap.2010.02.013

Duff, P. A. (2007). Problematising academic discourse socialisation. Learning discourses and the discourses of 184–
learning, 1(1), 1–18.

Klimova, B. (2015). Designing an EAP Course. Social and Behavioral Sciences, 191, 634–638.
doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2015.04.329

Wette, R. (2014). Teachers' practices in EAP writing instruction: Use of models and modelling. System, 42, 60–69. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2013.11.002

1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

C1.05 – 1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

Case/Problem-based learning in the Master of Osteopathic Medicine: Reflections on 10 years of delivery

Dr Paul Orrock, School of Health and Human Sciences
Presented in room C1.05, 1pm-2pm

Case-based Learning is a means of teaching that prompts students to analyse and discuss a complex situation from a real-world context. It is considered a sub-category of Problem-based Learning and has been found to improve higher order critical thinking and independent learning. I have taught using this system in a clinical Masters program for 10 years and have reflected and adapted the pedagogy to include online and blended delivery in response to student feedback and levels of success. Preparing students to graduate as independent osteopathic healthcare practitioners requires a pedagogy that matches the complexity that they will encounter in clinical practice. The biopsychosocial/holistic model that underpins the curriculum means that patient management is tailored and unique to the individual, so problem solving occurs throughout a consultation as well as on reflection when the patient has left.  Using authentic cases that simulate the real world, students record their reasoning in a sequential manner, submit a tutorial paper, and then attend a facilitated tutorial to explore and discuss every element of the case. The issues that have required adjustment over the period of development include setting an appropriate class size; reducing assessment workload demands; accumulating a library of cases, and receiving regular blackboard technical support. In the session I will present my experience of problem solving and improvement.

Harman et al (2015). Case-based learning facilitates critical thinking in undergraduate nutrition education: students describe the big picture. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 115(3), 378–88. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2014.09.003

Nkhoma, M., Lam, T., Sriratanaviriyakul, N., Richardson, J., Kam, B., & Lau, K. (2017). Unpacking the revised Bloom’s taxonomy: developing case-based learning activities. Education + Training, 59(3), 250–264. https://doi.org/10.1108/ET-03-2016-0061

C1.05 – 1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

Engaging students in online collaboration through group wiki assessment

Dr Tania Von der Heidt, School of Business and Tourism
Presented in room C1.05, 1pm-2pm Qld

Student engagement and motivation are a challenge for today’s educators. Students consistently refer to the need for engaging pedagogy that is content driven, blended, appropriately challenging and designed in a way in which what is learnt and how it is applied can be readily determined. Students also demand a stimulating learning environment that gives them the opportunity to learn synchronous and asynchronously with their peers and prepares them for the workforce (Young, Klemz & Murphy, 2003).
One way to meet these student demands and build student engagement is through an online collaborative problem solving and writing assessment in a group wiki within the Blackboard LMS. Such an assessment has been offered in the first-year Marketing Principles unit since 2012. In a 12-week session, it commences with group formation by enrolment location in Week 3 and runs for six weeks until assessment due date at beginning of Week 9. In groups of two to four, students are charged with applying creative problem solving (CPS) to develop a new or improved sustainable market offering and to progressively apply other marketing concepts. Weighted at 35%, each group member needs to contribute substantively to the wiki content. A 10% minimum wiki contribution is required for a student to be eligible to earn the group mark. Students are encouraged to write in their wiki progressively. 
A problem encountered in recent years with widening student participation (around 50% of students are with partner institutions) was late engagement with the wiki assessment. To incentivise students to engage earlier with their group wikis, two work-in-progress (WIP) bonus tasks were introduced in 2019. The first WIP task due in Week 5 involves each student contributing a draft CPS document to the wiki. The second WIP in Week 7 requires all group members to collaboratively create and draft the first five wiki pages of the assessment. Both tasks are assessed by the responsible tutor and provides constructive feedback to helps the group improve their wiki for the final assessment. An analysis of the WIP at Week 8 of Session 2 showed 77% of students had attempted one or both of the WIP tasks and achieved 25% to 100% of the bonus. All groups, which had attempted the WIP tasks, went on to attempt the final wiki assessment.
The group wiki builds student online engagement (as per Vivek, Beatty & Dalela, 2014) in three ways: (1) The two WIP tasks encourage students to direct their attention to commencing the assessment in a timely manner and to maintain attention; (2) enthused participation is encouraged by relating each week’s learning materials to the assessment task – both in lectures and in tutorials; (3) social connection (interaction with others) is developed by undertaking the online in groups.

Vivek, S. D., Beatty, S. E., Dalela, V., & Morgan, R. M. (2014). A generalized multidimensional scale for measuring customer engagement. Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice, 22(4), 401–420.

Young, M. R., Klemz, B. R., & Murphy, J. W. (2003). Enhancing learning outcomes: The effects of instructional technology, learning styles, instructional methods and student behavior. Journal of Marketing Education, 25(2), 130–142.

C1.05 – 1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

Andragogy – engaging adult learners – online teaching trends & experiences

Theresa Mason, School of Business and Tourism

With a decade’s online teaching experience, in this presentation I will outline successes, challenges, strategies and methods for engaging students online, as well as explore online teaching trends. Andragogical teaching/learning strategies will be used to stimulate thought about the discourse and encourage participatory reflexivity.
Universities have responded to changing demographics, technological developments and cultural shifts by diversifying content delivery, using new interface methods, and recognising adult education as a co-creation of learning. An online ontology equips students for diverse futures, develops digital literacy skills, and makes study possible for varying demographics, while meeting accessibility requirements. Research suggests students enjoy blended learning methods (Uur, Akkoyunlu & Kurbanolu, 2011), and trends point to steady increases in online study modes.
Online learning accentuates the Knowlesean concept of self-directed learning, where the learner makes decisions about “content, methods, resources and evaluation” (TEAL, 2019). Because we learn best by doing, educators need to look for opportunities to introduce interactivity. With ongoing cultural, theoretical and technological changes, my approach as an educator is necessarily dynamic and responsive. Teaching is not just something we do; it’s an active learning process for all involved.

TEAL Center (Teaching Excellence in Adult Literacy). n.d. TEAL Center Fact Sheet No. 11: Adult Learning Theories.  LINCS, access resources for state adult education staff. Retrieved from https://lincs.ed.gov/state-resources/federal-initiatives/teal/guide/adultlearning

Uur, B., Akkoyunlu, B., & Kurbanolu, S. (2011). Students' opinions on blended learning and its implementation in terms of their learning styles. Education and Information Technologies, 16(1), 5–23. doi:http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.scu.edu.au/10.1007/s10639-009-9109-9

C4.14 – 1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

Evaluating online student engagement: Examples of good practice from the UK’s Open University

Dr Patrick Gillett, School of Business and Tourism
Presented in room C4.14, 1pm-2pm

Established in 1969, the Open University (OU) is recognised as the world’s first, and largest, distance learning institution for Higher Education (The Open University, 2018). Throughout its lengthy history, the OU has embraced and pursed the use of technologies for teaching and learning purposes. As a result, it has earned a well-deserved reputation for its creative ‘technology-enhanced’ pedagogies (Marr, 2018, p. 53).
A 4-day visit to the OU in October 2019 provides the opportunity to investigate, first-hand, the institution’s approach to online pedagogy. Meetings and discussions are scheduled with a range of personnel involved in the University’s ‘100% online’ Master of Business Administration (MBA) course. This includes the Program Director, Lecturers and Instructional Designers.
Given the complex and multi-faceted nature of pedagogy (Loughran 2013), the investigation will achieve a focused approach by seeking to identify the methods used at the OU to evaluate student engagement. Although student engagement itself has received considerable attention in the HE literature (Wimpenny & Savin-Baden, 2013), much less is known about the ways in which engagement can be evaluated (Wilson, Broughan & Marselle, 2018). This is particularly the case for the online learning context.
In order to add further focus to the investigation, discussions with OU personnel will centre on the behavioural changes of students as result of their involvement in online engagement activities. Behavioural change is a central feature of two recently proposed student engagement models and is therefore considered to be an appropriate target for the investigation. These models are the Student Engagement Evaluation Framework (SEEF) (Thomas, 2017) and the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW) (Michie, Atkins & West, 2011), which has been adapted to the student engagement context by Wilson, Broughan and Marselle (2018).

Loughran, J. (2013). Pedagogy: Making sense of the complex relationship between teaching and learning. Curriculum Inquiry, 43(1), 118–141.

Marr, L. (2018). The transformation of distance learning at Open University. The need for a new pedagogy for online learning. In A. Zorn, J. Haywood & J. M. Glachant (Eds.), Higher Education in the Digital Age: Moving Academia online (pp. 23–34). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing.

Michie, S., Atkins, L., & West, R. (2014). The behaviour change wheel: A guide to designing interventions. London: Silverback Publishing.

The Open University. (2018). Annual Report 2017/2018. Retrieved from http://www.open.ac.uk/about/main/sites/www.open.ac.uk.about.main/files/files/Annual-report-2017-18_2.pdf

Thomas, L. (2017). Evaluating student engagement activity: report, evaluation framework and guidance. Retrieved from http://tsep.org.uk/evaluation-framework/

Wilson, C., Broughan, C., & Marselle, M. (2018). A new framework for the design and evaluation of a learning institution's student engagement activities. Studies in Higher Education, 0, 1–14.

Wimpenny, K., & Savin-Baden, M. (2013). Alienation, agency and authenticity: A synthesis of the literature on student engagement. Teaching in Higher Education, 18(8), 311–26.

C4.14 – 1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

Creating presence through rich sensory online environment

Dr Erika Kerruish, School of Arts and Social Sciences
Presented in room C4.14, 1pm-2pm Qld

This paper reflects on the online delivery of a unit titled Sensory Cultures (SASS) that was initially conceived to be largely delivered to an on-campus cohort that included visual arts and music students.  Over time it has come to be delivered in an online format only. Students initially express scepticism that a unit about sensory cultures can be delivered online.  In response, in 2018 I attempted to create multisensory online experiences that were shared objects for students, generating a sense of community and teacher presence. This was supported by Zoom drop-in rooms that provided real-time interaction and a sense of an embodied teacher.
Part of my research examines the cultural dimensions of perception and telepresence (Kerruish, 2019a), as well as multisensory computing (Kerruish, 2019b), so I am aware that an engaging sensory environment can be digitally created. This does not necessarily require complex technology because people’s perception and sense of presence is intimately related not only to sensory experience but to framing commitments and practices (Dreyfus, 2000).   Subsequent to my experience of delivering Sensory Cultures online, I am reflecting on the relevance of this to online teaching. The unit is subsequently being rewritten to explicitly address the question of technology and the senses, so that it is clearly situated in our hyperaesthetic culture (Howes, 2004) and explores possibilities for engaging experimentally online. The paper will conclude by strategies I am considering and seeking input from seminar participants as to regarding possible methods and strategies.

Dreyfus, H. (2000). Telepistemology: Descartes' last stand.  In K. Goldberg (Ed.), The Robot in the Garden: Telerobotics and Telepistemology in the Age of the Internet (pp. 48–63). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Howes, D. (2004). Hyperaesthesia, or the sensual logic of late capitalism. In D. Howes (Ed.), Empire of the Senses (pp. 281–303). Oxford: Berg.

Kerruish, E. (2019a). Arranging sensations: smell and taste in augmented and virtual reality. The Senses and Society 14(1), 31–45.

Kerruish, E. (2019b). Lessons on telepresence from the Mars explorer Rovers: Merleau-Ponty and the open perceptual circuit. Culture, Theory and Critique (pp. 1–15).

C4.14 – 1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

The potential benefits of using guided notes in online lectures

Neil McRudden, SCU College
Presented in room C4.14, 1pm-2pm Qld

Effective lecture delivery is central to successful university learning. Note-taking during lectures is an important skill required by students to facilitate comprehension and develop knowledge of course content. The online student experience of lectures often contrasts with that of the on-campus student. Pre-recorded course content lectures offer students the convenience of watching, re-watching and pausing the content at their convenience. However, a lack of lecturer immediacy, and the absence of interaction with the lecturer act as potential barriers to student engagement with the lecture material (Jacobi, 2016). While live online lectures provide more opportunities for interaction, such as the opportunity to asking questions or use polling tools; the lecture experience is often one of PowerPoint slides presented with a voice-over. Selwyn (2016) points out that students may feel demotivated if lecturers are perceived to be reading off the slides at the expense of interacting with the audience. Selwyn (2016) also notes that many online lectures have the hurried feel of a broadcast that excludes opportunity to question and reflect. In some cases, the PowerPoint slides themselves may present a barrier to content comprehension, as instead of ameliorating the learning experience, the slides often distract students from the content delivered orally (Driessnack, 2005; Savoy, Proctor & Salvendy, 2009).
The use of guided notes; however, has been shown to improve student ability to focus on content from traditional live lectures by increasing engagement with the lecture while simultaneously reducing student cognitive load (Blom, 2017; Williams, Weil & Porter, 2012). This presentation explores the use of the guided notes online to improve student engagement with material and reduce some of the perceived negative impressions of online lectures. Practical examples of how such guided notes may be introduced will be offered before discussion and questions around the concepts of student note-taking in an online environment are invited – with a particular focus on the international student experience in SCU College units.

Blom, R. (2017). Guided note taking and student achievement in a media law course. Journalism and Communication Educator, 72(4), 384–396. doi:10.1177/1077695816653857

Driessnack, M. (2005). A closer look at PowerPoint. The Journal of Nursing Education, 44(8), 347–347. Retrieved from https://www.healio.com/journals

Jacobi, L. (2016). The trifecta approach and more: Student perspectives on strategies for successful online lectures, i.e.: Inquiry in Education, 8(2), 1–15. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.nl.edu/ie/vol8/iss2/3/

Savoy, A., Proctor, R. W., & Salvendy, G. (2009). Information retention from PowerPoint™ and traditional lectures. Computers & Education, 52(4), 858–867. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2008.12.005

Selwyn, N. (2016). Digital downsides: Exploring university students’ negative engagements with digital technology. Teaching in Higher Education, 21(8), 1006–1021. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2016.1213229Williams, W. L., Weil, T. M., & Porter, J. C. K. (2012). The relative effects of traditional lectures and guided notes lectures on university student test scores. The Behavior Analyst Today, 13(1), 17. Retrieved from http://baojournal.com/

C4.15 – 1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

Co-creating quality learning experiences with individuals in blended and online learning environments: An example

Emma Babbage, School of Law and Justice
Presented in room C4.15, 1pm-2pm Qld

Creating quality learning experiences is the core business of teaching. And that core business transverses blended and online learning environments. But what a quality learning experience is will differ from environment to environment, and individual to individual. So the purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how, in one unit in one session (LAW10157-2018-1), I worked to co-create quality learning experiences with the 121 face-to-face and online students through adopting – and adapting – teaching strategies for different environments and different individuals.
In line with SCU’s Strategic Goal 1 and the impetus for teaching staff and students to engage in “co-creating learning”, this presentation will exemplify the pedagogy and strategies I adopted and adapted to co-create quality learning experiences with different students in blended and online environments. I will exemplify how Vyogtsky’s (1978) zone of proximal development (‘ZPD’) (McDevitt et al., 2013) and Koehler and Mishra’s (2009) model of the integration of technology, pedagogy and content knowledge (‘TPACK’) underpinned my use of Blackboard and Collaborate Ultra to tailor the instructional design to meet the needs of individual learners in blended and online environments. In addition, I will reflect upon Johnson’s (2016) categorisation of the purpose of information communication technologies (ICTs) as supporting, enhancing, and/or transforming the content taught without ICTs.
In engaging with the question of what it means to be a learner or an educator in an online or blended environment, this presentation will engage with the pedagogical question of what it means to be a learner and an educator from the motivational and emotional perspective (Mackay, 2016) of the individual and of the learning environment to which that individual belongs. I will share and reflect upon teaching plans, snippets of Collaborate recordings and chat box transcripts, Unit feedback and a 5 Star Teaching Commendation resulting from my teaching in this unit. The take-home/take-to-work message of this presentation will be that, as teaching staff, we can adapt pedagogically sound teaching strategies to meet the needs of online learning environments through technology, as well as the needs of individual learners regardless of their status as internal or online students. Because, after all, quality learning experiences are co-created by teachers and students as individuals and as communities of learners.

Johnson, N. F. (2016). Teaching with information and communication technologies. In R. Churchill, et al. (Eds.), Teaching: Making a Difference (3rd ed., pp. 330–360). Milton, Queensland: John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

Koehler, M. J., & Mishra, P. (2009). What is technological pedagogical content knowledge? Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 9(1), 60–70.

Mackay, J. (2016). Interactive student engagement and management. In R. Churchill, et al. (Eds.), Teaching: Making a Difference (3rd ed., pp. 362–419). Milton, Queensland: John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

McDevitt, T. M. et al. (2013). Cognitive development: Piaget and Vygotsky. In T. M. McDevitt, G. C. Ormrod, M. Chandler & V. Aloa (Eds.), Child Development and Education (pp. 202–245). Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia.

 

C4.15 – 1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

Creating quality online interprofessional learning experiences

Professor Sandra Grace, School of Health and Human Services
Presented in room C4.15, 1pm-2pm Qld

As health education transitions towards interprofessional curricula, the use of online technologies can provide ways to bring interprofessional learners together. In this presentation I will discuss strategies for developing students’ and educators’ presence and community in online interprofessional learning spaces. These strategies include: 1) self-directed learning spaces where students and educators can reflect on online resources that are drawn from different health professions, 2) online learning spaces where skills for effective teamwork can be developed, 3) virtual communities of practice for developing integrated clinical reasoning skills, and 4) virtual clinics and video case conferencing. Examples will be drawn from the emerging body of literature and from practice and are designed to prompt reflection on the quality of the educational experience in the online learning environment as students develop through phases of interprofessional learning (from early exposure, to immersion, and finally to collaborative patient care).

Djukic, M., Adams, J., Fulmer, T., Szyld, D., Lee, S., Oh, S.-Y., & Triola, M. (2015). E-learning with virtual teammates: A novel approach to interprofessional education. Journal of interprofessional care, 29(5), 1356–1820. doi:10.3109/13561820.2015.1030068

Fowler, T., Phillips, S., Patel, S., Ruggiero, K., Ragucci, K., Kern, D., & Stuart, G. (2018). Virtual Interprofessional Learning. Journal of Nursing Education, 57(11), 668–674. doi:10.3928/01484834-20181022-07

Lee, A. L., DeBest, M., Koeniger-Donohue, R., Strowman, S. R., & Mitchell, S. E. (2019). The feasibility and acceptability of using virtual world technology for interprofessional education in palliative care: A mixed methods study. Journal of interprofessional care. doi:10.1080/13561820.2019.1643832

Liaw, S. Y., Soh, S. L.-H., Tan, K. K., Wu, L. T., Yap, J., Chow, Y. L., … Wong, L. F. (2019). Design and evaluation of a 3D virtual environment for collaborative learning in interprofessional team care delivery. Nurse Education Today, 81, 64–71.

Liaw, S. Y., Wu, L. T., Wong, L. F., Soh, S. L.-H., Chow, Y. L., Ringsted, C., ... Lim, W. S. (2019). "Getting everyone on the same page": Interprofessional team training to develop shared mental models on interprofessional rounds. Journal of General Internal Medicine. doi:10.1007/s11606-019-05320-z

Lockeman, K. S., Dow, A. W., & Randell, A. L. (2019). Evaluating a budget-based approach to peer assessment for measuring collaboration among learners on interprofessional teams. Evaluation and the Health Professions. doi:10.1177/0163278719826227

Palumbo, M. V., De Gagne, J. C., & Murphy, G. (2016). Interprofessional care of elders: Utilizing the virtual learning environment. J Am Assoc Nurse Pract, 28(9), 465–470. doi:10.1002/2327-6924.12368

Quesnelle, K. M., Bright, D. R., & Salvati, L. A. (2018). Interprofessional education through a telehealth team based learning experience focused on pharmacogenomics. Currents in Pharmacy Teaching & Learning, 10, 1062–1069.

Reeves, S., Fletcher, S., McLoughlin, C., Yim, A., & Patel, K. D. (2017). Interprofessional online learning for primary healthcare: findings from a scoping review. BMJ Open, 7(8), 9. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016872

C4.15 – 1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

Blending online career development and employability skills content within a Nursing curriculum

Suzie Grissell and Gina Werner, Careers and Employability Service
Presented in room C4.15, 1pm-2pm Qld

We will share context, design and results of the collaboration between our Careers and Employability (C&E) service and academics from the Bachelor of Nursing at Southern Cross University, in creating blended online content and delivery. This session outlines how we developed a fully embedded, nursing-specific, C&E program rolled out across each year of the degree in an efficient overlay. We describe how we collaborated to blend C&E workshops, online lectures, tutorials and resources into content from the existing course.
With growth in student numbers across all three campuses it was imperative that the delivery be sustainable whilst remaining effective in developing concepts for successful graduate outcomes. C&E and curriculum content was combined, enabling students to grow in competence and be better prepared for graduate applications.
Hard data has shown that timely embedding of this customised content has had a direct impact on employment results and graduates’ lifelong employability.

C4.16 – 1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

What it takes to be an online teacher

Dr Lisa Jacka, School of Education
Presented in room C4.16, 1pm-2pm Qld

Lisa first embraced technology for teaching when she was a High School Visual Arts teacher. Now she teaches teachers online and has been doing so for over 15 years. In 2015 her online teaching and unit design was recognised with a Vice-Chancellor’s Citation for Excellence in Student Engagement for innovative design and delivery of online learning experiences that facilitate education students’ readiness to teach in learning environments of the future. Lisa’s PhD study explored virtual worlds in education and her sole-authored book, Making Learning Real, charts the use of this innovative learning environment. So what does it take to be an online teacher? Lisa’s latest research uncovers some of the beliefs that University academics have about the benefits of teaching online. This presentation provides insights into teaching online from the perspective of a teacher who loves the online teaching and learning experience.

C4.16 – 1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

Effectively delivering library classes to the masses: The challenge of converting face-to-face to online

Cintamani Brown, Skye Ravenscroft and Carlie Nekrasov, Library Services
Presented in room C4.16, 1pm-2pm Qld

The Health and Human Sciences Library Liaison team created a set of online information literacy classes for units with high enrolments. The content mirrored what was previously delivered during face to face classes. The need for this was driven by increasing student numbers, particularly in nursing on the Gold Coast, and the subsequent increase in the number of classes required to be delivered by library staff. The challenge of providing information to greater numbers of students without a concurrent increase in staff has been identified at other academic libraries (Walters et al., 2015). The methodology developed can be applied to the delivery of information literacy to students in other units and disciplines.
We provided the online module to four different units. We were aware that moving into an online learning environment meant students would need resources which were interactive and that engaged them in the learning process (Greer, Nichols, Hess & Kraemer, 2016). With this in mind, the tutorial was developed using the software LibWizard, which allows for self-paced, guided and interactive content. We included short videos, quizzes and live searching activities.
Based on student feedback and our own evaluation, there are a number of elements we plan to adapt to continue improving this resource. This includes the mode of delivery, how students interact with the content and methods for evaluating learning outcomes. We plan to use a flipped classroom approach, whereby students complete a general online module before the session, and then use this new knowledge to complete engaging activities in class (Caroll, Tchangalova & Harrington, 2016). This approach provides additional opportunities for “student’s exposure to information literacy instruction; rather than a traditional one-shot library session” (Loo et al., 2016, p. 274) and there has been an increase of research published on the benefits of this model (Obradovich, Canuel & Duffy, 2015). We believe that this would be the best approach to take for facilitating engaging learning activities and imparting practical, useful skills for our students.

Carroll, A. J., Tchangalova, N., & Harrington, E.G. (2016). Flipping one-shot library instruction: Using Canvas and Pecha Kucha for peer teaching. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 104(2), 125–129. http://dx.doi.org/10.3163/1536-5050.104.2.006

Greer, K., Nichols Hess, A., & Kraemer, E.W. (2016). The librarian leading the machine: A reassessment of library instruction methods. College & Research Libraries, 77(3), 286–299. https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.77.3.286

Loo, J. L., Eifler, D., Smith, E., Pendse, L., He, J., Sholinbeck, M., … Dupuis, E .A. (2016). Flipped instruction for information literacy: Five instructional cases of academic librarians. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 42(3), 273–280. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2016.03.001

Obradovich, A., Canuel, R., & Duffy, E. P. (2015). A survey of online library tutorials: Guiding instructional video creating to use in flipped classrooms. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 41(6), 751–757. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2015.08.006

Walters, K., Bolich, C., Duffy, D., Wuinn, C., Walsh, K., & Connolly, S. (2015). Developing online tutorials to improve information literacy skills for second-year nursing students of University College Dublin. New Review of Academic Librarianship, 21(1), 7–29. https://doi.org/10.1080/13614533.2014.891241

C4.16 – 1pm to 2pm Parallel Sessions

If you thought face-to-face teaching was a challenge try teaching remote online

Dr Paul Maj and Dr Katalin Dobos, Southern Cross University, Perth Campus
Presented in room C4.16, 1pm-2pm
Education is an extremely competitive, global industry. Teaching and learning (T&L) are core business but based on 20th century learning theories (Constructivism, Behaviourism, Cognitive Load Theory etc.) that are ‘soft’ sciences. Soft sciences are concerned with the complexities of human behaviour and hence methods are subjective, qualitative with difference interpretations resulting, in the case of education, in wide variations in the quality of T&L outcomes. eLearning tools, based on these 20th century learning theories, cannot ensure improved T&L outcomes. The problems are exacerbated when learning occurs in an entirely remote, online mode. By contrast ‘hard sciences’ are empirical, objective, quantitative, self-correcting etc. The (new) Science of Learning (SoL) has the objective of optimised learning. Successful use of SoL can result in significant improvements in T&L outcomes for remote online students achieved in considerably less time with implications for institute competitiveness in a national and international context.

Maj, S. P. (2018). Cognitive Load Optimization – A New, Practical, Easy to Use Teaching Method for Enhancing STEM Educational Outcomes Based on the Science of Learning. Paper presented at the IEEE TALE, Wollongong.