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National Marine Science Centre Coffs HarbourSession 1Session 1
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Unit description

Explores the nature of economics as relevant to sustainable development. This involves learning from the trappings of historical economic paradigms and engaging with economic instruments/methods as a way of managing and preventing environmental degradation. This unit engages with topical issues such as population, climate change and water scarcity to apply economic rationale to your understanding of these issues using interactive tutorial workshops as a learning tool.

Unit content

  • Introduction to ecological economics: what is it and why it matters for sustainable development?
  • Market systems: supply, demand and production
  • Market failure: why pollution, climate change and poverty exist
  • Ecosystem goods and services and environmental accounting
  • Valuing the environment: an overview of the techniques and theories
  • Changing behaviour: using economic instruments in environmental management
  • Economic development and environmental decision making
  • Economics and agriculture: feeding the world and conserving our land
  • Managing natural resource use: scarcity, abundance and renewables
  • The economics of water resources management

Learning outcomes

Unit Learning Outcomes express learning achievement in terms of what a student should know, understand and be able to do on completion of a unit. These outcomes are aligned with the graduate attributes. The unit learning outcomes and graduate attributes are also the basis of evaluating prior learning.

GA1: Intellectual rigour, GA2: Creativity, GA3: Ethical practice, GA4: Knowledge of a discipline, GA5: Lifelong learning, GA6: Communication and social skills, GA7: Cultural competence
On completion of this unit, students should be able to:GA1GA2GA3GA4GA5GA6GA7
1demonstrate understanding of the nature of the economic problem of scarcity and the implications this will have for resource allocationKnowledge of a discipline
2analyse the relationship between economic activity and the natural environment and the implications for sustainable developmentCreativityKnowledge of a discipline
3critically appreciate the difference between environmental economics and ecological economicsCreativityKnowledge of a disciplineCommunication and social skills
4discuss the importance of interdisciplinary sciences and identify the role of economics in resolving environmental issuesCreativityKnowledge of a disciplineCommunication and social skills
5demonstrate presentation and discussion skills as relevant to environmental consulting, research and making a positive impact. CreativityKnowledge of a disciplineCommunication and social skills

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. demonstrate understanding of the nature of the economic problem of scarcity and the implications this will have for resource allocation
    • GA4: Knowledge of a discipline
  2. analyse the relationship between economic activity and the natural environment and the implications for sustainable development
    • GA2: Creativity
    • GA4: Knowledge of a discipline
  3. critically appreciate the difference between environmental economics and ecological economics
    • GA2: Creativity
    • GA4: Knowledge of a discipline
    • GA6: Communication and social skills
  4. discuss the importance of interdisciplinary sciences and identify the role of economics in resolving environmental issues
    • GA2: Creativity
    • GA4: Knowledge of a discipline
    • GA6: Communication and social skills
  5. demonstrate presentation and discussion skills as relevant to environmental consulting, research and making a positive impact.
    • GA2: Creativity
    • GA4: Knowledge of a discipline
    • GA6: Communication and social skills

Prescribed texts

  • Asafu-Adjaye, J, 2005, Environmental Economics for Non-Economists. ISBN: 981-256-123-4.
Prescribed texts may change in future study periods.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching method
Lecture on-site 2 hours (11 weeks)
Tutorial on-site 2 hours (11 weeks)
Self-directed project 8 hours (13 weeks)
Assessment
Participation10%
Portfolio50%
Research Proposal15%
Presentation25%

Teaching method
Lecture on-site 2 hours (11 weeks)
Tutorial on-site 2 hours (11 weeks)
Self-directed project 8 hours (13 weeks)
Assessment
Participation10%
Portfolio50%
Research Proposal15%
Presentation25%

Teaching method
Lecture online 2 hours (11 weeks)
Structured online learning 1.5 hours (4 days)
Self-directed project 8 hours (13 weeks)
Residential session 8 hours (2 days)
Assessment
Participation10%
Portfolio50%
Research Proposal15%
Presentation25%
Notice

Intensive offerings may or may not be scheduled in every session. Please refer to the timetable for further details.

Southern Cross University employs different teaching methods within units to provide students with the flexibility to choose the mode of learning that best suits them. SCU academics strive to use the latest approaches and, as a result, the learning modes and materials may change. The most current information regarding a unit will be provided to enrolled students at the beginning of the study session.

Fee information

Domestic

Commonwealth Supported courses
For information regarding Student Contribution Amounts please visit the Student Contribution Amounts.
Commencing 2020 Commonwealth Supported only. Student contribution band: 2

Fee paying courses
For POSTGRADUATE or UNDERGRADUATE full fee paying courses please check Domestic Postgraduate Fees OR Domestic Undergraduate Fees

International

Please check the international course and fee list to determine the relevant fees.

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