Unit aim

This unit develops higher-level understandings of literacy pedagogy, skills and knowledge.  This is then applied with a practical focus on planning and programming, application of curriculum and learning routines, and assessment for effective literacy learning with respect to both early childhood and primary settings. The diversity of literacy learners and differentiation of the curriculum are addressed, as is the effective use of ICTs in the teaching of literacy in diverse classrooms.

Unit content

Differentiation and Diversity:

Knowledge of multi-literacies and other literacies across and within the English curriculum and the teaching of literacy (visual, multi-literacies, techno-literacies).

Ways of differentiating curriculum to meet the diverse needs of learners in the English classroom/early childhood settings including use of IEP/PLSs, visual, multi-literacies, and techno-literacies: for EAL/D students; low SES students; culturally diverse students; students from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds; and gifted and talented. students.

Role and value of English in the broader school/early childhood curriculum, including, e.g. syllabus, EAL/D scales, and the relationship between English other KLAs.

Pedagogy, Skills and Knowledge:

Understanding the elements of the physical, psychological and social classroom/early childhood environment, including online learning environments and literacy teaching routines. 

Application of knowledge of the literacy curriculum, teaching and learning strategies, resources, and pedagogy to the teaching of literacy in early childhood and primary contexts.

Deepening understanding about literacy programs and interventions in use in schools/centres, with special focus on the teaching of phonics and phonemic awareness in the processes of becoming literate.

Knowledge and evaluation of a range of contemporary literacy programs and interventions in use in centres/schools

Role and value of English in the broader school curriculum including cross-curriculum priorities and general capabilities with a focus on literacy and numeracy

Literacy Assessment:

Assessment of literacy needs; types of literacy assessment for use with children early years to 12; the assessment cycle; assessment strategies; continuous assessment; recording and reporting; NAPLAN and its place; program evaluation.

Using literacy assessment data to design differentiated learning activities.

Planning for literacy learning:

Planning for, with scholarly justification, the establishment of a literacy learning environment.

Planning for literacy learning, including: establishment of pedagogies for early childhood and primary settings, kinds of planning (year, term, unit and weekly plans); engaging with the content/elements of planning; completing a quality plan for literacy teaching; accommodating for and understanding student differences and needs; assessment for planning.

Learning outcomes

Unit Learning Outcomes express learning achievement in terms of what a student should know, understand and be able to do on completion of a unit. These outcomes are aligned with the graduate attributes. The unit learning outcomes and graduate attributes are also the basis of evaluating prior learning.

Learning outcomes and graduate attributes

Prescribed texts

Session 2

  • No prescribed texts.
Prescribed texts may change in future study periods.

Teaching and assessment

Coffs Harbour

Teaching method
Lecture on-site 1 hour (4 weeks)
Tutorial on-site 2 hours (10 weeks)
Assessment
Report40%
Literacy plan/Program/Unit of work (in two submissions)60%

Gold Coast

Teaching method
Lecture on-site 1 hour (4 weeks)
Tutorial on-site 2 hours (10 weeks)
Assessment
Report40%
Literacy plan/Program/Unit of work (in two submissions)60%

Lismore

Teaching method
Lecture on-site 1 hour (4 weeks)
Tutorial on-site 2 hours (10 weeks)
Assessment
Report40%
Literacy plan/Program/Unit of work (in two submissions)60%
Notice

Intensive offerings may or may not be scheduled in every session. Please refer to the timetable for further details.

Southern Cross University employs different teaching methods within units to provide students with the flexibility to choose the mode of learning that best suits them. SCU academics strive to use the latest approaches and, as a result, the learning modes and materials may change. The most current information regarding a unit will be provided to enrolled students at the beginning of the study session.

Fee information

Domestic

Commonwealth Supported courses
For information regarding Student Contribution Amounts please visit the Student Contribution Amounts.
Commencing 2015 Commonwealth Supported only. Student contribution band: 1

Fee paying courses
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International

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