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2021 unit offering information will be available in November 2020

Unit description

Introduces students to the role of science in understanding complex socio-ecological interactions involved in our biggest global challenges, including climate change, land degradation, biodiversity loss and pollution. Students will build an understanding of the foundations, philosophies and ethics that underpin science and society. Engaging with complexity and Indigenous thinking enables students to develop creative solutions to complex global challenges.  This unit also supports students to develop academic skills, including academic writing, literature searching, referencing, collaboration, critical thinking and science-communication.

Unit content

Using case studies of globally important environmental challenges, the following will be explored:

  • The development of science philosophy, and how it influences society and nature.
  • The value and limitations of science, including ethical considerations of research practice.
  • Intersections and connections between Indigenous knowledge and scientific knowledge.
  • The role of science in society and vice versa: the ways that science can affect the functioning of societies, and societal influences on the operation of science.
  • Societal engagement in science for developing complex and comprehensive solutions, including the role of stakeholders in addressing global environmental challenges.
  • Skill development in academic research, writing, referencing, collaboration and reflection.

Learning outcomes

Unit Learning Outcomes express learning achievement in terms of what a student should know, understand and be able to do on completion of a unit. These outcomes are aligned with the graduate attributes. The unit learning outcomes and graduate attributes are also the basis of evaluating prior learning.

GA1: Intellectual rigour, GA2: Creativity, GA3: Ethical practice, GA4: Knowledge of a discipline, GA5: Lifelong learning, GA6: Communication and social skills, GA7: Cultural competence
On completion of this unit, students should be able to:GA1GA2GA3GA4GA5GA6GA7
1to describe and explain the philosophical underpinnings of science, including how this influences society and natureEthical practiceCommunication and social skillsCultural competence
2critically examine the value and limitations of science in addressing global challengesEthical practiceCommunication and social skillsCultural competence
3demonstrate the foundational academic skills required to produce and critique science-based communicationsCommunication and social skills
4describe the attributes of different stakeholder groups and how this may influence engagement in science and positive changeEthical practiceCommunication and social skillsCultural competence
5demonstrated capacity to collaborate in a scholarly and professional settingCommunication and social skills

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. to describe and explain the philosophical underpinnings of science, including how this influences society and nature
    • GA3: Ethical practice
    • GA6: Communication and social skills
    • GA7: Cultural competence
  2. critically examine the value and limitations of science in addressing global challenges
    • GA3: Ethical practice
    • GA6: Communication and social skills
    • GA7: Cultural competence
  3. demonstrate the foundational academic skills required to produce and critique science-based communications
    • GA6: Communication and social skills
  4. describe the attributes of different stakeholder groups and how this may influence engagement in science and positive change
    • GA3: Ethical practice
    • GA6: Communication and social skills
    • GA7: Cultural competence
  5. demonstrated capacity to collaborate in a scholarly and professional setting
    • GA6: Communication and social skills

Prescribed texts

  • Prescribed text information is not currently available.
Prescribed texts may change in future study periods.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching method
Lecture on-site 2 hrs (11 weeks)
Tutorial on-site 2hrs (11 weeks)
Assessment
Short written response10%
Critical review25%
Project30%
Reflective writing35%

Teaching method
Lecture on-site 2 hrs (11 weeks)
Tutorial on-site 2 hrs (11 weeks)
Assessment
Short written response10%
Critical review25%
Project30%
Reflective writing35%

Teaching method
Residential session 7 hrs (1 day)
Tutorial online 1.5 hrs (10 weeks)
Lecture online 2 hrs (11 weeks)
Assessment
Short written response10%
Critical review25%
Project30%
Reflective writing35%
Notice

Intensive offerings may or may not be scheduled in every session. Please refer to the timetable for further details.

Southern Cross University employs different teaching methods within units to provide students with the flexibility to choose the mode of learning that best suits them. SCU academics strive to use the latest approaches and, as a result, the learning modes and materials may change. The most current information regarding a unit will be provided to enrolled students at the beginning of the study session.

Fee information

Domestic

Commonwealth Supported courses
For information regarding Student Contribution Amounts please visit the Student Contribution Amounts.
Commencing 2021 Commonwealth Supported only. Student contribution band: 2

Fee paying courses
For POSTGRADUATE or UNDERGRADUATE full fee paying courses please check Domestic Postgraduate Fees OR Domestic Undergraduate Fees

International

Please check the international course and fee list to determine the relevant fees.

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