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Unit description

Provides insight into what is needed to build resilience for our agricultural systems and communities, on local and global scales. Students will gain knowledge of the science of climate change, how we know our climate is changing; how this impacts natural cycles; why we are seeing an increasing number of disasters; and how we can predict what might happen next. Students will learn about some of the barriers to change, including neoliberalism and climate denialist behaviour. Resilience theory, and a range of regenerative solutions and mitigation approaches will be explored, including transformative research approaches — such as what Indigenous knowledge can teach us about understanding complex problems. There is an emphasis on building skills in developing an understanding of our role in mitigating complex global challenges, while working on practical solutions for building resilience in our rural landscapes and communities.

Unit content

  1. The science of climate change — natural cycles and the evidence base

  2. The impacts of climate change — environmental, socio-cultural, psychological and economic

  3. Business as usual? — Climate denial, neoliberalism and economic growth

  4. Resilience, mitigation and regeneration — Indigenous knowledge and living solutions

  5. Food production in a changing climate: why we need to regenerate our agricultural systems

  6. Building community resilience — disasters, vulnerability and community strategies

Learning outcomes

Unit Learning Outcomes express learning achievement in terms of what a student should know, understand and be able to do on completion of a unit. These outcomes are aligned with the graduate attributes. The unit learning outcomes and graduate attributes are also the basis of evaluating prior learning.

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:
1describe approaches to building resilience across communities and landscapes
2explain theories of socio-ecological resilience and complexity in relationship with Indigenous knowledge
3demonstrate high-level knowledge of the complexities involved in building resilience in the face of climate change
4create innovate approaches to mitigating climate change at a personal level
5create innovate approaches to mitigating climate change at a community and/or landscape level

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. describe approaches to building resilience across communities and landscapes
  2. explain theories of socio-ecological resilience and complexity in relationship with Indigenous knowledge
  3. demonstrate high-level knowledge of the complexities involved in building resilience in the face of climate change
  4. create innovate approaches to mitigating climate change at a personal level
  5. create innovate approaches to mitigating climate change at a community and/or landscape level

Prescribed texts

  • Paul Hawken (editor), 2018, Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming, Penguin, United Kingdom.
  • Reinette Biggs, Maja Schluter and Michale L Schoon (Eds), 2015, Principles for Building Resilience – Sustaining Ecosystem Services in Social-Ecological Systems, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. ISBN: 978-1107082656 .
  • Tyson Yunkaporta, 2019, Sand Talk, Text Publishing, Melbourne, Australia. ISBN: 9781925773996.

  • Prescribed text information is not currently available.
Prescribed texts may change in future study periods.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching method
Lecture on-site 3hr (6)
Tutorial on-site 3hr (6)
Assessment
Reflective writing35%
Participation15%
Project50%

Teaching method
Lecture online 3hr (6)
Tutorial online 3hr (6)
Assessment
Reflective writing35%
Participation15%
Project50%
Notice

Intensive offerings may or may not be scheduled in every session. Please refer to the timetable for further details.

Southern Cross University employs different teaching methods within units to provide students with the flexibility to choose the mode of learning that best suits them. SCU academics strive to use the latest approaches and, as a result, the learning modes and materials may change. The most current information regarding a unit will be provided to enrolled students at the beginning of the study session.

Fee information

Domestic

Commonwealth Supported courses
For information regarding Student Contribution Amounts please visit the Student Contribution Amounts.

Fee paying courses
For postgraduate or undergraduate full fee paying courses please check Domestic Postgraduate Fees OR Domestic Undergraduate Fees

International

Please check the international course and fee list to determine the relevant fees.

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