Availabilities:

LocationDomesticInternational
Lismore
Term2,4
Term2,4
Online
Term2,4
N/A

Unit description

Explores the emergence of holistic, complex adaptive systems approaches to thinking and knowledge, compared with reductionist science and mechanistic understandings of nature, and indigenous knowledges. Examines human ecology, including the role of different belief systems and their impact on ecological perspectives, which in turn influence individual and communal behaviour. Considers the role of ecological literacy in the context of regenerative agriculture. Students explore their connection to the environment, to systems and to holistic thinking through theory and practice, and how this can contribute to transformative change for our land and societies.

Unit content

  • The role of values, world views and the narratives shaping our perspectives and decisions
  • Mechanistic models and complex adaptive phenomena
  • A meta-view of ecology: evolution and the holarchy model
  • Mechanistic and ecological paradigms in the context of regenerative agriculture
  • Building an understanding of holism and it's guiding role in regenerative thinking and action
  • Values, imagination and complexity thinking
  • Ecological literacy, ecological thinking & ecological feeling in regenerative agriculture
  • Self organisation, emergence and the challenge of paradox in complex phenomenon
  • Philosophy of regenerative agriculture and it's connections with indigenous thinking
  • Indigenous understandings of self, nature and change
  • What is required to bring about transformative change

Learning outcomes

Unit Learning Outcomes express learning achievement in terms of what a student should know, understand and be able to do on completion of a unit. These outcomes are aligned with the graduate attributes. The unit learning outcomes and graduate attributes are also the basis of evaluating prior learning.

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:
1evaluate differences between mechanistic and complex adaptive systems worldviews and how this influences ecological perspectives, science and land management practice
2apply reflective analysis to understand the relationship between worldview and land management, including one's personal relationship with the natural world
3develop an understanding of the role of Indigenous thinking and knowledges, including their role for supporting transformative change in agriculture
4bring diverse and multidisciplinary knowledges together to explain what may be required to enable transformative change

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. evaluate differences between mechanistic and complex adaptive systems worldviews and how this influences ecological perspectives, science and land management practice
  2. apply reflective analysis to understand the relationship between worldview and land management, including one's personal relationship with the natural world
  3. develop an understanding of the role of Indigenous thinking and knowledges, including their role for supporting transformative change in agriculture
  4. bring diverse and multidisciplinary knowledges together to explain what may be required to enable transformative change

Prescribed texts

  • Prescribed text information is not currently available.

  • Prescribed text information is not currently available.
Prescribed texts may change in future teaching periods.

Teaching and assessment

Notice

Intensive offerings may or may not be scheduled in every teaching period. Please refer to the timetable for further details.

Southern Cross University employs different teaching methods within units to provide students with the flexibility to choose the mode of learning that best suits them. SCU academics strive to use the latest approaches and, as a result, the learning modes and materials may change. The most current information regarding a unit will be provided to enrolled students at the beginning of the teaching period.

Fee information

Domestic

Commonwealth Supported courses
For information regarding Student Contribution Amounts please visit the Student Contribution Amounts.

Fee paying courses
For postgraduate or undergraduate full fee paying courses please check Domestic Postgraduate Fees OR Domestic Undergraduate Fees

International

Please check the international course and fee list to determine the relevant fees.

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