Availabilities:

2022 unit offering information will be available in November 2021

Unit description

Explores the origins of Australian law from both jurisprudential and historical viewpoints, and the structure of our legal institutions and divisions of legal personnel. Develops skills of legal reasoning, the ability to interpret cases and statutes, and clear and concise oral and written legal communication.

Unit content

1. Legal Education 

2. Statutory Interpretation 

3. Precedent: The Standing Cases 

4. Legal Theory and Earth Laws 

5. Reception of English law 

6. Australian Legal Institutions 

7. The Role of Discretion, Judges, Police and Policy Makers 

8. Land rights: A Case Study in Precedent 

9. Statutory Interpretation Revisited 

10. The State of Exception: Terrorists, Bikies and Peaceful Protesters 

11. Access and Equality Before the Law 

12. Revision and Exam Preparation

Learning outcomes

Unit Learning Outcomes express learning achievement in terms of what a student should know, understand and be able to do on completion of a unit. These outcomes are aligned with the graduate attributes. The unit learning outcomes and graduate attributes are also the basis of evaluating prior learning.

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:
1explain the ways in which legal and social phenomena are inter-related
2critique law from a number of perspectives including ecological, feminist, post-modernist, multicultural and Indigenous perspectives
3explain the various legitimating techniques used by the legal system to justify the assertion of sovereignty by centralised authority
4utilise specific skills to predict the ways in which legal rules will be interpreted and applied, namely the theory of precedent and the rules governing the interpretation of statutes
5critique the role of the judiciary in the mystification and legitimisation of law and assess law's claims to be neutral and objective
6communicate face-to-face, online and in writing, with precision and clarity, utilising a variety of media to engage with the process of learning
7engage in collaborative group work with other students.

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. explain the ways in which legal and social phenomena are inter-related
  2. critique law from a number of perspectives including ecological, feminist, post-modernist, multicultural and Indigenous perspectives
  3. explain the various legitimating techniques used by the legal system to justify the assertion of sovereignty by centralised authority
  4. utilise specific skills to predict the ways in which legal rules will be interpreted and applied, namely the theory of precedent and the rules governing the interpretation of statutes
  5. critique the role of the judiciary in the mystification and legitimisation of law and assess law's claims to be neutral and objective
  6. communicate face-to-face, online and in writing, with precision and clarity, utilising a variety of media to engage with the process of learning
  7. engage in collaborative group work with other students.

Teaching and assessment

Notice

Intensive offerings may or may not be scheduled in every teaching period. Please refer to the timetable for further details.

Southern Cross University employs different teaching methods within units to provide students with the flexibility to choose the mode of learning that best suits them. SCU academics strive to use the latest approaches and, as a result, the learning modes and materials may change. The most current information regarding a unit will be provided to enrolled students at the beginning of the teaching period.

Fee information

Domestic

Commonwealth Supported courses
For information regarding Student Contribution Amounts please visit the Student Contribution Amounts.

Fee paying courses
For postgraduate or undergraduate full fee paying courses please check Domestic Postgraduate Fees OR Domestic Undergraduate Fees

International

Please check the international course and fee list to determine the relevant fees.

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