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2022 unit offering information will be available in November 2021

Unit description

The ocean as we know it is the result of physical, chemical and biological processes working in concert. This unit introduces students to the fundamental concepts of oceanography, being physical (ocean currents, circulation and waves), chemical (major and minor ions in seawater) and biological in nature (the planktonic realm). A major emphasis will be on fostering an understanding of how the three interact to drive processes of global significance leading to essential ecosystem service provisions of various kinds (e.g. food/harvest and climate regulation). p { margin-bottom: 0.25cm; line-height: 120% }

Unit content

1) Ocean currents and their drivers

2) Waves and tides 

3) Major and minor elements in seawater and their distribution

4) Chemical tracers as tools to gain process based understanding

5) The base of marine food webs - phytoplankton

6) Zooplankton as a link to nekton and bacteria to close the loop

Learning outcomes

Unit Learning Outcomes express learning achievement in terms of what a student should know, understand and be able to do on completion of a unit. These outcomes are aligned with the graduate attributes. The unit learning outcomes and graduate attributes are also the basis of evaluating prior learning.

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:
1demonstrate enhanced understanding of the nature and drivers of major ocean current systems, and their significance in Earth's climate system
2explain the behavior of major and minor ion composition in seawater and their interaction with geological and biological cycles.
3describe the contributors to marine primary productivity and analyse the relationship between phytoplankton, zooplankton, nekton and bacteria.
4demonstrate a clear understanding of the interactions of physics, chemistry and biology in shaping the ocean.

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. demonstrate enhanced understanding of the nature and drivers of major ocean current systems, and their significance in Earth's climate system
  2. explain the behavior of major and minor ion composition in seawater and their interaction with geological and biological cycles.
  3. describe the contributors to marine primary productivity and analyse the relationship between phytoplankton, zooplankton, nekton and bacteria.
  4. demonstrate a clear understanding of the interactions of physics, chemistry and biology in shaping the ocean.

Teaching and assessment

Notice

Intensive offerings may or may not be scheduled in every teaching period. Please refer to the timetable for further details.

Southern Cross University employs different teaching methods within units to provide students with the flexibility to choose the mode of learning that best suits them. SCU academics strive to use the latest approaches and, as a result, the learning modes and materials may change. The most current information regarding a unit will be provided to enrolled students at the beginning of the teaching period.

Fee information

Domestic

Commonwealth Supported courses
For information regarding Student Contribution Amounts please visit the Student Contribution Amounts.

Fee paying courses
For postgraduate or undergraduate full fee paying courses please check Domestic Postgraduate Fees OR Domestic Undergraduate Fees

International

Please check the international course and fee list to determine the relevant fees.

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