Teaching and Learning in the Southern Cross Model

The Southern Cross Model delivers superior student outcomes, based on interactive, media-rich and responsive learning with focused six-week terms.

Staff around a table discussing the SCU Model with educational and multimedia icons overlaying the scene

Teaching and Learning in the Southern Cross Model

Background to the Southern Cross Model

Southern Cross University was established to promote scholarship, research, free inquiry, the interaction of research and teaching, and academic excellence (Southern Cross University Act 1993, 6[1]).

In 2019 the Southern Cross University Council endorsed a new approach to bring a more explicit focus on delivering outstanding teaching. The University identified the need to strive toward achieving curriculum reform, distinction and uplift.

Dialogue began about the effectiveness of a range of teaching and learning approaches. A period of consultation began with Faculties, Colleges, professional work units, current students and potential future students from the broader community. From these discussions emerged the imperative to further explore innovative approaches to higher education teaching and learning with a view to developing the new Southern Cross Model.

Academic, teaching delivery and operational design teams made up of staff members from across the University reviewed a number of approaches to educational design and delivery in Australia and overseas, and made a series of recommendations which ultimately came to form the basis of the Southern Cross Model.

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Professional Learning for the Southern Cross Model

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The Southern Cross Model Key Features

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Teaching and Learning in the Southern Cross Model

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Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in the Southern Cross Model

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Student Feedback, Staff Experiences and Results

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The Southern Cross Model Key Features

At Southern Cross University, we are revolutionising our curriculum to deliver immersive learning experiences. The Southern Cross Model delivers superior student outcomes, based on interactive, media-rich and responsive learning with focused six-week terms (Southern Cross University Strategy 2030).

The model is focused and flexible:

The academic year is divided into 6 Terms. Each Term is delivered over 7 weeks, with 6 weeks of teaching and a 7th week in each Term which may be used for study, review and assessment. A 2 week break occurs between Terms.

Full-time students enrol in a maximum of 2 units per Term. Students are not required to study in all 6 Terms. Typically a full-time student will study four Terms and complete 8 units a year. This means there are fewer units and fewer assignments and exams for a student to juggle at one time.

The model enables active engagement:

The new Southern Cross Model offers our students a guided and active learning experience, whether they are enrolled online or on-campus. Students will have access to a comprehensive suite of online materials at any time during their studies.

Students are engaged in two forms of guided and active learning – self access learning which is delivered in interactive and guided modules, and class learning that focus on active, guided experiences that extend and apply the skills and knowledge covered in the self-access modules.

Introduction to the Southern Cross Model placeholder for video

The Southern Cross Model is an exciting and distinctive new way of teaching and learning.
The Southern Cross Model is flexible and designed to give you more control over when you study.
Instead of completing units over 12-week sessions, you can study over shorter, six-week terms.
This means that you can determine the intensity of your studies.
You can do up to two units at a time in each term, or you can choose to do just one unit at a time if that suits you best.
One of the great things about the Southern Cross Model is that your learning is focused.
Instead of juggling four units at once – and often four essays, reports or exams at once – you will be able to focus your time and energy on just one or two assessments at a time. This will help you succeed in your studies.
In the Southern Cross Model, the teaching methods put your learning first.
All students will be able to access online learning materials that are on-demand, interactive and give you feedback to help you gauge your learning.
You will also benefit from active, guided class experiences, both online and off. In class, you will apply new knowledge and skills to real-world problems and questions.
The Southern Cross Model is designed to help you achieve your goals and work towards the future you want in a more flexible, focused, and learning-centred environment.
We look forward to welcoming students to the Southern Cross Model and seeing students succeed and shine at university and beyond.

An introduction to The Southern Cross Model. An explanation of the changes to a study year in the introduction of Terms.

Study

You can study over shorter 6 week terms.

Focus

One of the great things about the Southern Cross Model is that your learning is focused.

Flexible

The Southern Cross Model is flexible and designed to give you more control over when you study.

Teaching

In the Southern Cross Model, the teaching methods put your learning first.

Teaching and Learning in the Southern Cross Model

The Southern Cross Model uses guided, active learning experiences in both self-access and class learning.

In guided learning, students advance their knowledge and skills with the support of others. Guided learning comes in a range of learning activities including:

  • Curated material with opportunities for practice
  • Modelling practice
  • Joint problem-solving or questioning.

Guided learning can be used in classes online or on campus, as well as in online self-study or through using self-paced learning resources.

Self-access learning in the Southern Cross Model is a guided learning experience facilitated through University learning sites. It affords students the opportunity to progress through learning material at a time and pace that is right for them within each study period. The learning content is sequenced by academics to build students’ knowledge and skills and is bundled into media-rich learning packages called modules.

Self-access learning is distinct from didactic instruction characterised by unidirectional interaction between more and less knowledgeable interlocutors, as in lecturing or simply giving students access to readings via a learning site. In the Southern Cross Model content is accompanied by interactive learning activities which are designed by academics to require responses from the learner (e.g. problems). These activities should be designed to help students gauge their understanding of the material and help academics assess student learning engagement and progress.

Class learning in the Southern Cross Model is a scheduled learning experience which happens either on campus or online in real-time. It is facilitated through lesson plans to ensure a consistent quality of delivery across locations and modalities (online/ on-campus). Whether studying online or on-campus, students will have the opportunity to routinely participate in scheduled class learning. Class learning in the Southern Cross Model breaks down the distinction between lecture and tutorial, it involves the engaging presentation of chunks of content to which students are required to actively respond.

Class teaching requires interaction and opportunities for academics to monitor and assess student engagement and development of their skills, knowledge and application of those.

In the Southern Cross Model, all students can attend scheduled classes, regardless of their mode of enrolment. A single weighted unit in the Southern Cross Model will typically be delivered via up to 3 hours of class learning and up to 20 hours self-access learning per week. This may differ in units with specific requirements.

In class, students will be engaged in guided, active learning. They should no longer only listen and note-take, as in the traditional lecture mode.  Rather they will be engaged in active, interactive and dialogue-based learning.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in the Southern Cross Model

The Southern Cross Model will be explored and evaluated through a range of scholarship of teaching and learning projects.

These projects will examine outcomes for students in the Model and explore the approaches taken during the Model’s implementation.

You can read the findings of these projects in the Southern Cross University Scholarship of Learning and Teaching Paper Series.

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Publications and media on the Southern Cross Model

Most recent

Goode, E., Roche, T., Wilson, E., & McKenzie, J. W. (2023). Implications of immersive scheduling for student achievement and feedback. Studies in Higher Education, 48(7), 1123 –1136. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2023.2184472

Other articles

Goode, E., Nieuwoudt, J. E., & Roche, T. (2022). Does online engagement matter? The impact of interactive learning modules and synchronous class attendance on student achievement in an immersive delivery model. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 38(4), 76–94. https://doi.org/10.14742/ajet.7929

Goode, E., Syme, S., & Nieuwoudt, J. E. (2022). The impact of immersive scheduling on student learning and success in an Australian pathways program. Innovations in Education and Teaching International. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2022.2157304

Nieuwoudt, J. E. (2023). Improving the academic performance and mental health of non-traditional university students through a shorter delivery model: Exploring the impact of the Southern Cross Model. Student Success, 14(1), 35–46. https://doi.org/10.5204/ssj.2660 

Forthcoming

Goode, E., Roche, T., Wilson, E., & McKenzie, J. W. (in press). Student perceptions of immersive block learning: An exploratory study of student satisfaction in the Southern Cross Model. Journal of Further and Higher Education.

Goode, E., Roche, T., Wilson, E., Zhang, J., & McKenzie, J. W. (in press). The success, satisfaction and experiences of international students in an immersive block model. Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice

Roche, T., Wilson, E., & Goode, E. (in press). Immersive learning in a block teaching model: A case study of academic reform through principles, policies and practice. Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice.  

Most recent

Wilson, E., Roche, T., Goode, E., & McKenzie, J. W. (2023). Creating the conditions for student success: The impact of an immersive block model at an Australian university. Southern Cross University Scholarship of Learning and Teaching Paper No. 10. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4560491

Roche, T., Goode, E., Wilson, E., & McKenzie, J. W. (2023). Supporting the academic success of students from equity backgrounds in higher education through immersive scheduling. Southern Cross University Scholarship of Learning and Teaching Paper No. 9https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4480689 

For a full list of pre-prints see the Southern Cross University Scholarship of Learning and Teaching Paper Series (subscribe here

Most recent

Southern Cross University. (2023, August 28). The Southern Cross Model: A chat with co-designers Professors Thomas Roche and Erica Wilson [Audio podcast episode]. In SCU Buzz. https://soundcloud.com/southerncrossuniversity/the-southern-cross-model-a-chat-with-co-designers-professors-thomas-roche-and-erica-wilson?in=southerncrossuniversity/sets/scu-buzz-the-southern-cross  

Other articles

Roche, T., Wilson, E., & Goode, E. (2022, November 27). Differences the Southern Cross Model makes. Campus Morning Mail. https://campusmorningmail.com.au/news/differences-the-southern-cross-model-makes/ 

Roche, T., Wilson, E., & Goode, E. (2022, July 28). How block teaching supports students from under-represented groups. Times Higher Education. https://www.timeshighereducation.com/campus/how-block-teaching-supports-students-underrepresented-groups 

Wilson, E., & Roche, T. (2022, November 20). Revolutionary teaching & learning the Southern Cross U way. Campus Morning Mail. https://campusmorningmail.com.au/news/revolutionary-teaching-learning-the-southern-cross-u-way/

Ongoing scholarship of learning and teaching (SoLT) projects

Sustainability and Work Integrated Learning (WIL): Current practices, challenges, and opportunities in the Australian Higher Education context

Investigators: Dr Clare Power (SCU), Dr Julia Caldicott (SCU), Rachael Baron (Latrobe)

Aims: The project will explore how sustainability is integrated in Work-integrated Learning (WIL)  throughout Australian Higher Education Institutions (HEI). Given its positioning across a broad range of sectors with multiple partnerships, WIL is a key strategic space for preparing graduates who can identify and respond to the complexity of environmental, social and economic sustainability issues.

Publications: This project will result in an ACEN report, webinar and conference presentation, as well as a WACE conference presentation. Additional publications (e.g. edited book) are also planned.

 

WIL in Nordic tourism higher education programs

Investigators: Professor Johan Edelheim (Uni of Hokkaido), Dr Julia Caldicott (SCU)

Aims: Work integrated learning (WIL) in various forms, has been and continues to be, a common inclusion in tourism higher education. Tourism higher education generally, and WIL specifically, often pursue an employability focus rather than fostering the development of active citizens capable of transforming the realities that we all live in. The purpose of this project is to explore how WIL is enacted in tourism higher education programs in the Nordic countries.

Publications: A journal article or edited book chapter is planned. 

 

Gamification and maths anxiety: Evidence from an online MBA finance subject

Investigators: Dr Jennifer Harrison, Dr Kayleen Wood

 

An assessment of eGameFlow and eLearningGameFlow instruments in an MBA learning context

Investigators: Dr Jennifer Harrison, Dr Kayleen Wood

Aims: This project aims to determine whether a highly-cited measure of e-learning game effectiveness, eGameFlow, and a recent adaptation of that instrument, eLearningGameFlow, can be validated in a postgraduate business learning context. The results will be useful to learning game designers in business courses.

Publications: A journal publication is planned. 

 

Critical thinking in higher education as a digital practice

Investigator: Dr Erika Kerruish

Aims: This project aims to establish how digitalisation changes the practice and teaching of critical thinking in higher education. Drawing on the work of the philosopher of technology Bernard Stiegler, it develops and employs a critical framework that understands humans and technology to be co-constituted.

Publications: A paper has been published in Pedagogy, Culture & Society. Additional journal papers are planned.

 

Teaching Presence Rubric

Investigators: Dr Patrick Gillett, Tina van Eyk, Kylie Day, Dr Carolyn Seton, Patrick Bruck

Aims: This project aims to develop a rubric to assess units for the Southern Cross Model. 

Publications: The project was presented at the SoLT Symposium 2022. A conference presentation and journal publication are planned.

 

Bright Futures mentor program in the Southern Cross Model

Investigators: Dr Julia Caldicott, Dr John Haw, Gina Werner, Leanne Baker

Aims: This project compares mentor and mentee satisfaction between the Southern Cross Model and trimester versions of the Bright Futures program.

Publications: A presentation at the SoLT Symposium 2023 and a journal publication are planned.

 

Respect for cultural diversity in the MPM online program

Investigator: Chris Lawler

Aims: This project aims to explore what the unit feedback survey question - “Respect for cultural diversity was embedded in this unit” means to the SCU MPM Online Cohort and what they would need to see within the units to demonstrate a respect for cultural diversity.

 

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on students’ sense of belonging at university

Investigators: Dr Megan Kelly, Dr Johanna Nieuwoudt, Dr Royce Willis, Dr Megan Lee (Bond U)

Aims: This study aims to build on previous investigations into higher education students’ sense of belonging, with specific exploration of factors that could influence students’ sense of belonging during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study reports on the relationship between students’ self-reported sense of belonging, motivation to study and enjoyment, assesses students’ sense of belonging against their consideration of leaving university, and compares changes in students overall sense of belonging prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Publications: Submitted to a journal.

 

Confidence in mathematics teaching: Exploring a community of inquiry-based approach for pre-service teachers

Investigator: Dr Lewes Peddell

Aims: This research study aims to investigate how anxiety towards mathematics and confidence in teaching mathematics may change from the beginning to the end of these units. Additionally, it will explore whether any changes in anxiety or confidence can be attributed to the design and delivery of the units.

Publications: A journal publication and conference presentations are planned.

 

Extracurricular practice training within the SCU Health Clinic

Investigators: Professor Fiona Naumann, Associate Professor Jacqui Yoxall, Dr Nicci Whiteing, Dr Andrew Woods, other academics from Health disciplines

Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate whether interprofessional education with the use of filmed client scenarios, simulated patients and/or immersive Mixed Reality (MR) technology can improve interprofessional practice, and support communication and collaboration in the management of a client or patient.

Publications: A presentation is planned for the SoLT Symposium 2023.

 

Implementation of IPE across curricula

Investigators: Dr Nicci Whiteing, Professor Fiona Naumann, Dr Jo Bradbury, Alex Terrill, Dr Louise Horstmanshof

Aims: As part institutional transition to a new way of learning, FOH had an opportunity to reimagine every course, course structure and unit. This provided a unique opportunity to systematically plan and develop an IPE curriculum that was inclusive of all health disciplines, that was capable of scaffolding the learning design and application process. The aim of this research is to summarise the process for the design and implementation of IPE across curriculum and identify successes, challenges and key lessons to guide faculty in IPE implementation. Second aim is to evaluate the impact on student learning.

Publications: A presentation is planned for the SoLT Symposium 2023.

 

Student experiences of learning in the Southern Cross Model

Investigators: Professor Fiona Naumann, Dr Lily Guo, Dr Ken Wojcikowski, Dr Jo Bradbury, Corrine Cribb, Melissa Kemp, Dr Nicci Whiteing, Associate Professor Paul Orrock, Dr Chris Stevens, Professor Jennene Greenhill

Aims: Explores the student satisfaction and confidence in learning in the old 13-week semester model, compared to the self-access interactive learning across 6 weeks. Methodology - Student Satisfaction and Confidence in Learning Questionnaire, Unit Success Rates, Unit Satisfaction, thematic analysis of student comments.

Publications: A presentation is planned for the SoLT Symposium 2023.

 

International student learning experience in the Southern Cross Model

Investigators: Professor Fiona Naumann, Dr Jena Buchan, Dr Elizabeth Emmanuel, Dr Ya-Ling Huang, Dr Michelle Bissett, Jacky Zhang, Ros Walpole, Associate Professor Sam Lapkin, Professor Jennene Greenhill

Aims: Explores the International student satisfaction and confidence in learning within the Southern Cross Model. Methodology - Student Satisfaction and Confidence in Learning Questionnaire, Unit Success Rates, Unit Satisfaction, thematic analysis of student comments and semi-structured interviews.

Publications: A presentation is planned for the SoLT Symposium 2023.

 

Equity student learning experience in the Southern Cross Model

Investigators: Dr Michelle Bissett, Dr Linda Furness, Dr Jena Buchan, Shelley Odewahn, Professor Jennene Greenhill

Aims: Exploring the learning experience of equity students within the SCM through semi-structured interviews. Also explores learning support for WIL.

Publications: A presentation is planned for the SoLT Symposium 2023.

 

Unit Warm-Up: Jump start into tertiary studies

Investigators: Dr Elizabeth Emmanuel, Dr Jenelle Benson, Associate Professor Marilyn Chaseling, Julie-Ann Paredes

Aims: This is a longitudinal study on the effects the Unit Warm-Up (UWU) had on increasing student preparedness and reducing student anxiety in first year large cohorts. This is a quantitative study over 4 years for a large nursing unit.

Publications: A working paper has been published on the SSRN Heliyon First Look series. A final paper has been accepted to Heliyon.

 

Influencers on student preparedness for first-year commencing students

Investigators: Dr Elizabeth Emmanuel, Dr Jenelle Benson, Associate Professor Marilyn Chaseling, Julie-Ann Paredes

Aims: This is the qualitative study over 4 years for the written feedback of the students that participated in the Unit Warm-Up (UWU) in the sessional model.

Publications: A journal publication is planned.

 

Online quizzes: Techniques for authentic assessment

Investigators: Associate Professor Steve Purcell, Dr Kayleen Woods

Aims: This project examines the pros and cons of summative quizzes in tertiary education and draws on new data from multiple units across two faculties at SCU. Our analysis explores the value of practice quizzes as a formative tool to improve student learning. Data are examined on the performance of students who cheat on non-proctored tests. This study also proposes elements of good and poor quiz questions and offers an array of techniques for preparing questions and quiz settings to foster authentic assessment in the Southern Cross Model. Strategies are proposed so that quizzes address real-world scenarios and assess students’ understanding and synthesis of unit content.

Investigating student experiences of a block teaching model in technical and non-technical courses

Investigators: Associate Professor Raina Mason, Dr Prithwi Chakraborty, Dr Carolyn Seton, Dr Jenelle Benson

Aims: Several research works have found block models to be successful overall, but it is yet unknown how the compressed timelines in the block model would perform for technical subjects, where students anecdotally need sufficient time to build their perception and understanding of the learning topic. This project aims to analyse data collected about success and comments from students to investigate the impact of a similar model on student success and satisfaction, and any potential differences between technical and non-technical courses.

STEM career development utilising GCA career registration mapping and industry feedback

Investigators: Dr Steve Pudney, Professor Anja Scheffers, Leanne Baker, Dr David Mills

Aims: This project will compare SCU’s career development teaching and learning to that of other Australian universities (currently 16). The project will utilise data collected from and continuing to be collected from “GCA’s Careers Registration (CR) Learning Gain research Project” of which SCU is an active participant. This time, the research will apply a more discipline-specific lens across the FSE STEM courses. It also aims to support SCU’s NPILF strategy through consultation with and feedback from industry.

Investigating key factors influencing students’ acceptance and satisfaction towards SCU block model e-learning system: Through the development of a comprehensive system acceptance and success model

Investigators: Dr Golam Sorwar, Associate Professor Raina Mason, Dr Reza Ghanbarzadeh, Dr Jenelle Benson

Aims: This study aims to identify a wider range of key predictors that may have strong effect on students’ acceptance of the new model, their satisfaction and success.  A theoretical framework will be developed based on the widely accepted Holsapple & Lee‐Post e-Learning Success Model (2006) with an integration of other models/factors informed by extant literature and students’ feedback data from the SCU LMS. The data will be analysed using a multivariate statistical analysis technique, Structural equation modelling (SEM), for inferential statistics to test hypotheses for identifying relationships among predictors and outcome variables.

Stories behind the fishing net: Sitting with the Aunties

Investigators: Kylie Day, Dr Kelly Menzel, Dr Jenelle Benson

Aims: This project will relate to an artefact for NAIDOC week.

Publications: A conference presentation and a journal publication are planned.

 

Indigenous pedagogy is good pedagogy: An ethnographic study at the teaching interface

Investigators: Dr Kelly Menzel and Kylie Day

Aims: This is an ethnographic study situated at Southern Cross University.

Publications: A conference presentation and a journal publication are planned.

 

IASS Aptitude Test

Investigators: Kylie Day, Dr Jenelle Benson, Anthony Olive

Aims: This is a project focused on redesigning Testing and Assessment.

Publications: Findings will be presented at the SoLT Symposium.

 

Decolonising, co-constructing, co-designing and Indigenising health curriculum

Investigators: Dr Kelly Menzel (SCU), Dr Kate Odgers-Jewell (Bond University), Associate Professor Dianne Reidlinger (Bond University), Professor Dawn Bennett (Bond University)

Aims: This research project will decolonise, co-design and co-construct curriculum utilising Indigenous knowledges, pedagogical and methodological approaches that de-emphasise the traditional student-teacher relationship and enable a learner-centred focus.

Publications: This project will be presented at the ANZAHPE Conference 2023 and the SoLT Symposium 2023, and will be developed into a journal publication.

 

Enabling Education: A cost effective way to empower student success

Investigators: Associate Professor Syme (SCU), Dr Stuart Levy (FUA), George Lambrinidis (CDU)

Aims: The project aims to demonstrate how enabling education with its underlying principles of embedded supportive curriculum and pedagogy empowers students for success in higher education and mitigates against failure in first year.

Publications: This project was presented at the NAEEA Conference 2022. A journal publication is in progress. 

 

Benchmarking of Enabling Programs across Australia

Investigators: Charmaine Davis (USQ), Associate Professor Suzi Syme (SCU), Chris Cook (CQU), Dr Sarah Dempster (UTAS), Lisa Duffy (ECU), Dr Sarah Hattam (USA), George Lambrinidis (CDU), Kathy Lawson (Curtin U), Dr Stuart Levy (FUA)

Aims: This project provides significant findings from the benchmarking of nine enabling Australian programs that will underpin the establishment of national standards for enabling education in Australia.

Publications: A report is available via the National Association of Enabling Educators of Australia. A paper has been published in Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education. The project was presented at the NAEEA Conference 2022.

 

Investigating the impact of the Southern Cross Model on non-traditional students’ mental health and academic performance

Investigator: Dr Johanna Nieuwoudt

Aims: This research contributes to the understanding of students’ perceived time pressure and mental health within shorter delivery models (e.g. Southern Cross Model) compared to traditional delivery models. This project aimed to determine if differences in: (a) psychological distress, (b) perceived time pressure, and (c) academic performance might exist between students engaged in traditional models of delivery and those engaged in shorter models of delivery.

Publications: A paper has been published in Student Success.

 

An investigation into the impact of diploma pathway programs on student academic and professional success

Investigators: Dr Johanna Nieuwoudt, Associate Professor Suzi Syme, Dr Rikki Quinn, Dr Grant Andrews

Aims: This project aims to investigate the impact to diploma pathway programs on students’ academic and professional success.

Publications: A journal publication is planned.

 

Academic practice in the Southern Cross Model: A co-operative inquiry

Investigators: Dr Liz Goode, Dr John Haw, Dr Sharen Nisbet, Dr Erica Russ, Robert Rollin, Dr Johanna Nieuwoudt

Aims: Through an ongoing process of co-operative inquiry, academic staff members from various faculties at SCU consider how their teaching philosophies and practices have changed over nearly two years of the Southern Cross Model.

Publications: This project was presented at the SoLT Symposium 2022. An SSRN paper and journal publication are planned.  

 

Scoping review: Transition programs for high school students

Investigators: Dr Johanna Nieuwoudt, Dr Liz Goode

Aims: This project aims to review the literature on transition programs for high school students to scope the body of literature and to identify knowledge gaps. The findings of this scoping review will then inform a future research project on high school pathways programs.

Publications: A journal publication is planned.

 

Exploring the experiences of Big Picture Learning Australia (BPLA) graduates who transition to university

Investigators: Fishcetti, J. (UoN), Down, B (Murdoch U), Edwards, D. (UWA), Sheridan, L. (UoW), Berger, N. (WSU), Swenson, S. (ANU), Singh, S. (UTS), Brett, M. (UTAS), Nieuwoudt, J.E. (SCU), Rutkowski, J. (BPLA), Lynch, D. (UoN).

Aims: This project aims to explore the experiences of Big Picture Learning Australia (BPLA) graduates who transition to university. Led by Prof. John Fishcetti at the University of Newcastle, it is anticipated that the findings of the study will provide suggestions for ways that BPLA can support the student experience.

 

Relating mathematical concepts to the real world: An exploratory study of enabling student attitudes, beliefs and experiences of mathematics in a six-week delivery model

Investigators: Dr Kerrie Stimpson, Associate Professor Suzi Syme, Dr Liz Goode

Aims: This project aims to investigate student attitudes, beliefs and experiences in an enabling mathematics unit that is designed to introduce novice non-traditional university students to mathematical concepts and applied problem-solving via a six-week delivery model. The project will examine student attitudes, beliefs and experiences:

  1. about their mathematical skills and relating these to real-world problems
  2. about the module design and what they found engaging and what they found challenging, with a particular focus on the impact of the new Southern Cross Model on learning experience and academic success.

Publications: This project was presented at the HERDSA Conference 2022 and the SoLT Symposium 2021. An SSRN working paper and a journal publication are planned.

 

Supporting first-year University student success via multi-disciplinary workshops: The College Connect way

Investigators: Dr Michael Brickhill, Dr Sue Muloin, Dr Johanna Nieuwoudt

Aims: This student analyses student performance data (within the unit EDUC1001 Language & Learning in Your Discipline and via GPA more broadly) to determine if there is a relationship between workshop attendance and academic performance.

Publications: This project was presented at the STARS Conference 2021. A journal publication is planned.

 

Enabling Academic Integrity through embedded curriculum, pedagogy and an educative approach

Investigator: Dr Michael Brickhill

Aims: This study aims to outline embedded curriculum and pedagogy for Diploma students, review academic integrity breach referrals of students to SCU’s Academic Integrity Management System (AIMS) and investigate various educative measures used to further students’ academic integrity knowledge and practice. 

Publications: An SSRN working paper and a journal publication are planned.

 

The relationship between the professional role and identity of English for academic purposes teachers: A phenomenological study

Investigator: Sharon Leslie

Aims: This doctoral thesis investigates the role played by EAP teachers in international education in Australia and the impacts of this role and context on their identity as educators.

Publications: Conference presentations and journal publications are planned.

 

Navigating Social Invisibility through Métissage

Investigators: J. Boschee (external), Sharon Leslie (SCU)

Aims: Using narrative métissage, this study explores the concept of social invisibility in five different cultural contexts, investigating distinct phenomena that relate to social order and organization.

Publications: This project has been presented at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Beijing Normal University (BNU) and University of Calgary (UCalgary) Doctoral Forum (2022). A journal publication is planned.

 

Assessment Practice in a Changing World: 2022 UECA Assessment Symposium Expert Panel Discussion

Investigators: Sharon Leslie, Professor Thomas Roche

Aims: This paper outlines the context for the 2022 UECA Assessment Symposium which explored integrated assessment and assessment practices in ELICOS, post-COVID. It then provides excerpts of the Expert Panel Discussion form the event.

Publications: An SSRN working paper is planned. 

 

Communities of Practice: Research in Quality Assurance and Leadership in English Language teaching

Investigator: Sharon Leslie

Aims: Over the past year, these two communities of practice have organised ELICOS sector-wide webinars and interactive online events about the future of ELICOS in Australia, promoted by the national ELICOS quality assurance body NEAS.

Publications: Panels will take place at the NEAS Management Conference 2023.

 

Case Study: Showcasing Enhanced Professionalism Through Quality Assurance

Investigators: Penelope Main (UNE), Neil McRudden (SCU), Zoe Hancock (SCU)

Aims: This session will describe the systematic approaches two different institutions took to respond to NEAS feedback following an initial NEAS Online Course Delivery Endorsement. The session aims to highlight the impacts of quality assurance conducted by peak bodies and stakeholders and to share what two institutions learned through this experience so that other centres may also benefit.

Publications: The case study will be presented at the NEAS Management Conference 2023.

 

UECA Integrated Assessment Grant

Investigators: Zoe Hancock (SCU), A. Windsor, Neil McRudden (SCU)

Aims: This project is a systematic literature review to Investigate strategies for enhancing the authenticity and person-centredness of integrated assessment by integrating employability skills development within ESL integrated assessment tasks.

Publications: This project will be presented at the UECA Assessment Symposium 2023. A journal publication is planned.

 

Are diploma students grittier? An exploratory study

Investigators: Dr Sue Muloin, Dr Johanna Nieuwoudt, Dr Michael Brickhill

Aims: Based on an extensive literature review and a survey of diploma students, this study aims to determine the level of grit in diploma students and the relationship between grit and student success.

Publications: A journal publication is planned. 

 

Investigating students’ experiences of the units A Culture of Enquiry and A Culture of Dialogue

Investigators: Dr Liz Goode, Dr Johanna Nieuwoudt, Professor Thomas Roche.

Aims: This project aims to investigate the efficacy of two foundational units designed to introduce new university students to academic enquiry and communication via the Southern Cross Model. The project will explore student success and engagement through inferential statistical analysis and student focus groups.

Publications: A paper is available in the Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, and outcomes will be presented at the HERDSA Conference 2023.

 

Student success and satisfaction in the Southern Cross Model

Investigators: Dr Liz Goode, Professor Thomas Roche, Professor Erica Wilson, Dr John McKenzie.

Aims: This project will explore the impact of the Southern Cross Model (SCM) on the academic success, satisfaction and retention of undergraduate students across the University. The project will compare unit performance data from the trimester model with data from units delivered in the SCM.

Publications: A paper on the year 1 outcomes is available in Studies in Higher Education. A working paper on student satisfaction is available via the University's SSRN series. Outcomes have been presented at the HERDSA Conference 2022 and 2023, the IBILTA Conference 2023 and the APAIE Conference 2023. Publications on the year 1 and 2 outcomes are forthcoming.

 

Implications of immersive scheduling for international student achievement, satisfaction and study-work-life-balance

Investigators: Dr Liz Goode, Professor Thomas Roche, Professor Erica Wilson, Jacky Zhang, Dr John McKenzie.

Aims: This project will examine the impact of the Southern Cross Model (SCM) on undergraduate international students studying onshore in Australia and offshore through English-medium instruction (EMI). The study draws on unit performance data (success and satisfaction) as well as interviews conducted with international students in 2021. 

Publications: A paper will be submitted to the Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice in April 2023. 

 

Raising the academic success of students from equity backgrounds in higher education through immersive scheduling

Investigators: Dr Liz Goode, Professor Thomas Roche, Professor Erica Wilson, Dr John McKenzie.

Aims: This study aims to examine the impact of the Southern Cross Model (SCM) on students from equity backgrounds, including students from low socio-economic status (LSES), non-English speaking (NESB), Indigenous and first-in-family backgrounds, and students registered with a disability. Academic performance and satisfaction measures will be compared across the trimester model and the SCM. 

Publications: A working paper will be submitted to the University's SSRN series in April/May 2023. A more developed paper will be submitted to a higher education journal.

 

Immersive learning in the Southern Cross Model: A case study of academic reform through principles, policies and practice

Investigators: Professor Thomas Roche, Professor Erica Wilson, Dr Liz Goode. 

Aims: This project is a descriptive case study of the whole-of-institution curriculum reform undertaken in the move to the Southern Cross Model. Based on a synthesis of literature in best practice higher education (HE) pedagogy and principles, the case study draws on both a review of policy and staff interviews to outline the key changes necessary for successful HE transformation. 

Publications: A working paper is available via the University's SSRN series. A more developed paper will be submitted to the Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice in April 2023.

 

Transforming assessment through the Southern Cross Model: One university’s shift to immersive teaching blocks

Investigators: Professor Erica Wilson, Professor Thomas Roche, Dr Lachlan Forsyth, Professor Andrew Rose, Dr Liz Goode. 

Aims: This project is a descriptive case study of how and why Southern Cross University transformed its approach to assessment in the Southern Cross Model. The project will outline the institution's journey in the Southern Cross Model and what was required for deep assessment reform.

Publications: A working paper will be submitted to the University's SSRN series in 2023. A more developed paper will be submitted to a higher education journal. The project will be presented at the Assessment in HE Conference 2023.

 

Trends in student experience (success/satisfaction) for new and continuing students in the SC Model

Investigators: Dr Jenelle Benson, Dr Jo Munn, Dr Mieke Witsel, Dr Lachlan Forsyth, Dr Polly Lai

Aims: COVID has transformed the use of online information in a way not seen before. At Southern Cross University, the learning is now being delivered in 6-week blocks. In this study, we will look at student satisfaction with the new learning model for new and continuing students. From this study of the new Southern Cross Model (SCM) we propose to answer the following questions:

  • Is there a link between assessment design and student satisfaction - is there a correlation or not?
  • Is there a link between learning tasks and assessments and student success/satisfaction?
  • Is there a link between the number of assessments and student success/satisfaction?
  • How are expectations being managed across different student cohorts (faculties) and does this affect student satisfaction?
  • Are existing students in different faculties more or less positive towards the new model?
  • Is there a common theme among all student feedback for positive/negatives in the SC model?
  • Is there a difference in perception of the model between new and existing students?

This study covers a 3-year period (2022, 2023, 2024)  of data with different points of time where publication is possible.

Publications: Findings will be presented at the SoLT Symposium 2023 and 2024, and will be developed into a journal publication.

 

Effects of incorporating the unit warm up in the orientation module on student satisfaction and success rates in the SC Model (working title)

Investigators: Dr Jenelle Benson, Dr Elizabeth Emmanuel, Dr Christos Markopoulos, Helen Walsh, Tina Van Eyk

Aims: Longitudinal studies have demonstrated that Unit Warm-Up (UWU) information is useful in reducing student anxiety about study and increase their understanding of what they need to do within a unit to succeed (Paper in Review). Moving from Session to A block model the need to support students to be successful is even more critical in the faster paced study environment. This study looks at how incorporating the Unit Warm-Up (UWU) factors that increased student success in the session model works in the block model. Three large units with over 500 students each are involved in the study across three faculties. The purpose is to determine if the same factors that were in the session UWU are still effective in the block model and if not what changes need to be made to the UWU objects to make them more effective in the Module Orientation area.

Publications: Findings will be presented at the SoLT Symposium 2023 and 2024, and will be developed into a journal publication.

 

Exploring a design studio approach for academic staff uplift in active learning pedagogy

Investigators: Dr Lachlan Forsyth, Dr Mieke Witsel, Dr Jenelle Benson, Dr Polly Lai, Dr Jo Munn  

Aims: This project seeks to answer the question: What are the success factors for harnessing an interdisciplinary design studio to support academic development in active learning design? Active learning is an important component of the teaching and learning that underpins the Southern Cross Model. The project will utilise a mixed-methods approach drawing on data from surveys, workshops, online communications, participant journals and developed resources. Participants will include a multi-disciplinary group of designers, including academic curriculum designers, educational designers and digital designers.

 

people holding various expression masks over their faces

Student Feedback, Staff Experiences and Results

Data on the impact of the Southern Cross Model have begun to emerge.
Early insights are captured in this presentation, featuring both staff and students.

Please see the list of publications and media above, and the comments and additional data below.

Listen to a student-led interview with the academic leads on the Southern Cross Model, Professor Thomas Roche and Professor Erica Wilson, in this podcast episode.

Listen to a student-led interview with the academic leads on the Southern Cross Model

What students are saying

The following feedback responses were received from B Business & Enterprise students (BBusEnt student) and Preparing for Sucess Program students (PSP student)

"Better than longer, drawn out subjects. A bit more focused on one thing which then can be used universally across other subjects." (BBusEnt student)

"The 6 weeks, although full-on, felt easier to manage and control tasks. It felt better getting things done quicker." (BBusEnt student)

"2 subjects over 6 weeks is the best workload experience I’ve ever had." (BBusEnt student)

"Found the workload hard to adjust to but once I did, it was more manageable." (BBusEnt student)

"Intense, but is achievable." (BBusEnt student)

"I was relieved because I remember trying to juggle four subjects was hard. So only focusing on two was a big relief." (PSP student)

"Having a focus point and knowing that that's where I've gottago, I think having more subjects on top of that would possibly come crashing down around me pretty quickly." (PSP student)

The following feedback responses were received from B Business & Enterprise students (BBusEnt student) and Preparing for Sucess Program students (PSP student).

"Yeah, I think just the fact that it's done, tick, I'm onto the next one. Now I'm going to break until third of July or whatever it is and yeah. I can do this." (BBusEnt student)

"Being able to do the activities within [the modules] felt in interactive, it felt like good practice to give you confidence…. I think having that was a confidence booster too, that you could give things a go in your own time as well." (BBusEnt student)

"I find it motivating… you've like, got to get it in. There's no time for procrastination." (PSP student)

"I honestly prefer the six weeks. It gives you a little break in between to kind of recollect yourself and then attack the next two topics." (PSP student)

The following feedback responses were received from B Business & Enterprise students (BBusEnt student) and Preparing for Sucess Program students (PSP student).

“I think it was kind of like a breath of fresh air because you're not just reading and reading and reading, you’re kind of doing something different and engaging a different part of your brain.” (BBusEnt student)

“I really enjoyed the modules for this unit. Just the little things where every so often, there’s like a little activity where you got to try and match the word to the right context and just little things like that to really reinforce what you're learning, I think that they’re really good.” (BBusEnt student)

"I feel like it was a bit of a mixture of everything, having all these different resources together as well as having that feedback, it helped piece all the bits together and help us gain a deeper understanding." (BBusEnt student)

“Yeah it keeps you engaged, like works different parts of your brain, keeps you sort of awake a bit to work through it.” (PSP student)

“I think the activities were really good… I think it kind of builds you to know where you need to focus.” (PSP student)

Tayla discussing the SCM

My name's Tayla. I'm studying the Diploma of Civil Construction and I'm an online student here at Southern Cross University.

I'm using my diploma as a pathway to get into the Bachelor of Engineering Systems so that I can do Civil Engineering as my specialisation.

The Southern Cross model is changing the way that students are able to study. So instead of you do doing your 13, 12-week session, you actually finish your unit in that first six-week block and then you have a break and then you do your next and your next.

You can take a term off if you need to or you can study more full-time.

It just allows room for you to just be a person.

So, I've already completed two of the units in this new study mode and I love it. It's so good. The teachers are just so on top of it and it's a new thing for everybody, but they're really, really good with it. Everyone's so understanding with it. And while you go a lot faster over that six-week course, it doesn't actually feel difficult. It doesn't feel like you're doing more work. It's just really, really well laid out.

And it gives you a lot more opportunity to study one thing and more in-depth because you're able to study more in a shortened period of time and actually still absorb all of it really well. So instead of doing four subjects at a time you can do two. Which means that you actually pay more attention in your subjects. It means that there's less subjects to divide your attention between. It's easier to concentrate on your assessment tasks and keep track of them and everything like that. It's so much easier as a student.

You can really see the finish line. It really motivates you to stay focused and just it's much easier to stay on topic.

So, I was studying the 12-week model in other universities and it wasn't going well, really wasn't suiting me.

But since coming to Southern Cross, I've gone immediately into this new model and getting high distinctions. And it's a relief and it's incredible. It's so nice.

The Southern Cross Model student experience: Tayla

Diploma of Civil Construction (Engineering and Management) student Tayla shares her experience of studying in the Southern Cross Model at Southern Cross University.

Davi giving feedback about SCM

My name is Davi Martins Algranti. I'm originally from Brazil, and I'm studying business and enterprise at Southern Cross University.

I've been always interested in business, as I want to be a businessman in the future.

And when I finished my high school, I came to Australia to learn English.

Then I took the IELTS course. Southern Cross University offered me a good scholarship.

So, studying in six weeks terms helped me a lot because we have just two units to study, so most of the time you're really focused in these two units and you are not stressed.

I can put everything together and summarise all the learnings that I have got in six weeks for my final assessments.

So, studying in short terms is giving me the possibility to organise my time, focus on my assessments in the right time, and at the same moment, work a little bit.

And I can be focused and maintain a good experience and maintain good grades.

Having a six-week term, it's a really good way to deliver education for us because, you can be focused and work through your assessments that time and work hard, but then when you have a two-week break, you can relax and recover your energy to come back motivated.

I like to do sports related with the nature. So, here on the Gold Coast, as we have the beach, I can skate along the beach and enjoy a beautiful place. At the same moment, when I'm surfing, I can be in the ocean and be connected with nature.

The teachers, they always support us with all the questions that we have, and they teach in a way that it's fun to learn.

Their passion, you can feel this. They love the job that they are doing.

I feel like studying in short terms, it's the best thing I've ever done, and I would strongly recommend for someone who wants to have a good experience studying and get new motivations to study in short terms because yeah, you will feel good and you can balance your time to work, study and have a good lifestyle.

The Southern Cross Model student experience: Davi

Bachelor of Business and Enterprise student Davi shared his experience of studying in the Southern Cross Model at Southern Cross University.

Staff experiences

James discussing the SCM

Hello My name is James Carlopio and I've been Southern Cross for about three or four years now, and I've been involved most recently in developing two brand new courses from scratch in the six-week mode.

Can you describe your approach to the unit modules?

We're trying to make the courses much more active rather than passive learning. We're trying to reduce the amount of reading. So in all three of the courses that I've been involved in, there's just there's no textbooks. We have very few but key essential readings. And even those are much more applied, like from a Harvard Business Review article.

Can you describe your approach to class learning in the model?

We've divided the class, learning opportunities into a few different modes, one is, of course, the student has to do the online learning and then when they're done with that and I always request that they do that before they come to the classroom bits. we've got two sessions every week and there's a one hour session and it's sometimes followed literally a back to back with a two hour session or there's a little bit of a gap in between the two. And in the first one hour session, we tend to focus on overview of the unit content to make sure that students understand that content is out of questions. That's the time for them to ask the questions. If there’s something I want to clarify that I couldn't do in writing, because it's so much easier sometimes to talk about things like this, and that the second two hour is truly, totally active.

What principles were important for designing assessments in the new model?

Assessment designed, obviously, when you're designing, of course, is a huge part of it, and we've got a distinctly different, I believe, a view around assessment now with the new model. every component builds on and feeds back and feeds forward to every other component. The end product in the final assessment is a real business plan that people should be able to use if they were really trying to start a business, because not everybody is. Some people just make up a hypothetical and some people starting their careers. But for the people who are really trying to start a business, the idea is to come up with a true business plan at the end. the feedback on the assessment is that they love that cumulative effect.

How was the student engagement in the model?

I have always been sensitive to the fact that students need a voice and, you know, you have to get the group talking and you have to get individuals engaged in asking questions and thinking.

I always think about the fact that the learning actually the most important person in the room is not the person at the front of the room. The learning happens in the seats in the room. I that's where the action is happening.

If they're not engaged, they're not listening, if they're not engaged, they're not talking and it's just not working for anybody.

What did you enjoy about teaching in the new model?

I love the sprint nature of the six week course that you can get just since me. And I think it suits the times. And that's what the students say. You know, it's the way we're used to working. It's the way we're used to living right now. We get in, we get engaged, we do something, and then we move on to something else. And that's that, I think the biggest the biggest change in my mentality, the biggest point about the whole system that fits with the world today, the way people process information today, the way young people want to have university education fit into their lives.

That, to me, is the most impressive.

And of course, that's hard. You know, if you've ever done real world sprinting, you're exhausted at the end of that that 100 metre dash, 200 metre dash. You're tired at the end of that that six week period. So, you know, you have to learn the skill of recuperating and rejuvenating during those two weeks. And I've heard lots of students talk about, oh, good, I'm going to take a couple of weeks off now and, you know, go away and rest because I've got to come back and get right into it again for the next six weeks.

So those are the biggest things that come to my mind.

The Southern Cross Model, Teaching and Learning Experience: James Carlopio

Staff member James Carlopio describes his Teaching and Learning experience with The Southern Cross Model.

Robert discussing the SCM

Hi, my name is Robert Rollin, and I've been lecturing in the Department of Engineering. I've been teaching in different courses starting from the associate degree, the Bachelor of Engineering Systems and the two masters degree that we offer at SCU.

So the associate degree in particular was designed to be offered under the new SCU model for the so all the new units and the associate degree in a few units from engineering that we converted were all offered straight out as under the new SCU model.

What do your units look like in the Southern Cross Model?

So I think the you the students like that, it's brief little  capsules of content and the and in my units, I did use a portfolio approach for assessment.

We used three case studies, so we use case studies from the industry. So they're a so this is engineering. So we had a small land development in Lismore that we're using it as an example. We're using the bridge designs from Kyogle Council and as a big project, give them the appreciation of a large project.

We would use the Coffs Harbour bypass on the Pacific highway.

I think the portfolio assessment worked well in terms of manageable, that every week did a little bit of work that helps them with their final assessments. And I think the one place I still need to improve is interlinking all of this, that the exercises in the unit content are better link to the story and to the assessment.

How did students respond to the assessments?

So the now the student feedback on the assessment with was, that they really enjoyed the real life examples and they also enjoyed getting to practise every week on the assessments, the portfolio approach, the portfolio approach also promoted interaction between the students.

So they were responsible to submit their answer every week. And then they also were required to critique each other's answers. So basically peer review and learning as a group. So they also enjoyed that. And so I think it really helps. Some of the people with more experience would share their knowledge so people with less experience would gain from that.

What did you learn while teaching in the Southern Cross Model?

A big difference for me is that at the end you need to be very well organised for the grading.

So that means that when you start planning your assessment, you need to think about I'm going to be grading in week six or six or at the beginning week seven, and I need to turn around my grades very quickly. So your assessments have to be planned to facilitate that. I've used a portfolio approach which helps with that approach. So I get to look at their work every week and then at the end it's a bit quicker to mark their final report.

What other advice would you give to colleagues about teaching in the new model?

I think my one best advice pieces of advice would be not to be afraid to ask for help, either from CTL or from some of your peers. I'm a big believer in teamwork and working as a team to deliver a better product. Yeah, I tried to reach out early, make sure CTL knows your needs as early as possible so they can plan it and then work within your faculty in your department to get the team effort to deliver great units for our students.

The Southern Cross Model, Teaching and Learning Experience: Robert Rollin

Staff member Robert Rollins describes his Teaching and Learning experience with The Southern Cross Model.

Liz discusses the SCM

Hi, my name's Dr Liz Goode, currently working as a teaching scholar in the Academic Portfolio office. But my usual role is teaching in the preparing success program at SCU College.

How did you approach designing unit modules for the Southern Cross Model?

So the unit modules for me needed to do a public key things as a priority. They needed to be focused and aligned very closely around specific learning outcomes and the concepts and skills required for any upcoming assessment task, so that alignment and the way the modules would sequence and scaffolded was really important.

And another thing I had front of mind was the need to invite students to do things at regular points in the modules. So I tried to develop a rhythm with this. That rhythm of just not letting text, videos or whatever it might be stretch on for too long without giving students an opportunity to do something meaningful or useful. I found that really important as I was putting together the modules.

What did students like about the unit Modules?

Students liked the variety of ways to interact with content. They liked that it wasn't just reading, but they could watch things. They could listen to things they could do, little activities that varied. Maybe there was like a quick quiz or drag and drop or a poll that allowed them to see their peers’ responses, too.

They also like that doing those kinds of things build their confidence. So it was an opportunity to gain familiarity with terms and concepts, to test out and try things, to go back and review when they needed, and to see what they're needed to focus on as well. So things that they wanted to follow up in class or to understand better. They got a sense of that from working through the modules, and they found that really helpful and really useful when they came to class, they felt like they already had a bit of a leg up and they enjoyed working through the interactive modules as well.

How did you approach to class learning in the model?

So class learning for me was principally about extending and expanding and going a little bit further than the modules to apply, to discuss, to investigate, in order problem solve the kinds of things that the modules covered.

So it's an active space where I feel students need to be doing activities that are meaningful and connect really clearly with the assessments and the learning outcomes. So you learned about this in the modules or you need to do this in your assessments. Let surface some of the questions or uncertainties that you might have. Let's talk about it together. Let's practise. Let's apply what you're learning in really relevant and useful ways.

What did students like about the classes?

In my conversations with students, they have highlighted a couple of things that they did like about the classes. Probably the main one is for social aspect of the classes. So they really enjoyed being able to be around and speak with other students, whether that was online or in a face to face classroom. So to see where others are out, to get to know each other and to do things like brainstorm in groups.

They really enjoy being able to discuss and analyse and make a start on assessment tasks and get clarification about the assessments. So what's expected, whether they're interpreting the task are regularly, whether they're on track, I found, was really valued by students as well.

What did you enjoy about teachi​ng in the new model?

I really enjoy the structure of it so that students have a variety of opportunities for learning that really complement each other. So it's not all about the modules, it's not all about the classes or all about the assessments, but it's all of those things working together. I really enjoyed that. I think that's a really powerful combination that has the potential to debate a learning partnership. So it allows the student, tutor the institution to work together to achieve a really great learning experience.

I've enjoyed the aspect of the new model.

Overall, what do you think about the new model compared to the 12-week model?

I think that the new model is really powerful and I keep coming back to that word powerful the way the interactive, self access modules and the classes where you apply and extend and work with peers and well designed scaffolded assessment tasks and work together to facilitate learning in ways that build students confidence and sense of achievement. I think that's really powerful. So that active, very aligned pedagogy has the potential, I think, to be immensely effective and I really like the more focused nature of it. I remember as a student myself, we often sound it quite overwhelming to be mentally pulled in so many different directions and for each unit to be such a long haul that it became quite exhausting, whereas the shorter, sharper, but deeper experience in the new model and I think the experiences of some of the pilot courses is showing us that learning outcomes in these courses aren't compromised.

Students are learning and achieving in ways that are just as strong or stronger than they did in a 12 or 13 week session.

So these are really positive signs and as an educator, I found it really exciting to witness and be a part of it. So I think the new model is a really positive step.

The Southern Cross Model, Teaching and Learning Experience: Liz Goode

Staff member Liz Goode describes her Teaching and Learning experience with The Southern Cross Model.

The impact of the Southern Cross Model

Comparing student success rates (pass rates) in 2019 (session model), student success has increased significantly in the Southern Cross Model (< .05). These increases have been observed across the University*, including domestic, international, undergraduate, postgraduate and non-award pathway students.

Student satisfaction with units and teaching has remained high overall. Looking at data aggregated across the University changes to satisfaction in the Southern Cross Model are not statistically significant.

See graph results below.

EPB = Educational Partnerships Board; FBLA = Faculty of Business, Law and Arts; FOE = Faculty of Education; FOH = Faculty of Health; Gnibi = Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples; SCU Coll. = SCU College

* Note that Law, the majority of Health, and the Hotel School did not transition to the Southern Cross Model until 2023.

graph showing unit success rates
Graph - Unit Success Rate in 2019 (session model), 2022 and 2023 (Southern Cross Model)

graph showing Unit satisfaction
Graph - Unit Satisfaction in 2019 (session model), 2022 and 2023 (Southern Cross Model)

graph showing Teaching satisfaction
Graph - Teaching Satisfaction in 2019 (session model), 2022 and 2023 (Southern Cross Model)