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Course summary

How do we think and learn? How do we control our movements and behaviour? What makes us tick? Exploration of the human mind is a fascinating field and this degree is an equally fascinating educational journey into behaviour, cognition, and psychological principles and theory.

You'll develop strong analytical and problem-solving skills, as well as proficiency in research and statistics, all of which will inform your ability to apply scientific approaches in professional settings.

Graduates can seek employment in health, social and disability services, youth services, corrective services, armed services, research agencies and education in a range of careers that require critical thinking and an understanding of human psychological factors.

Alternatively, eligible graduates may undertake a fourth year of study by enrolling in the accredited Bachelor of Psychological Science with Honours. Completion of this fourth year of study is the minimal educational qualification to apply for conditional registration as a postgraduate intern in psychology in Australia.

Southern Cross University is number 1 in Australia for teaching quality and student support in Psychology, and has a 5-star ranking for learner engagement, skills development and overall experience in Psychology (Good Universities Guide 2019). Southern Cross is also ranked number 1 in Australia for overall experience in Psychology (Quality Indicators in Learning and Teaching 2018).

 

DurationLocationSession

3F/6P

3.5 years minimum for students commencing in Session 3

Coffs Harbour1, 2, 3
Gold Coast1, 2, 3
Online1, 2, 3
DurationLocationSession

3F/6P

Coffs Harbour1, 2
Gold Coast2, 3

The course aims to equip students with analytical skills in solving human, organisational and community-wide problems; competency in the design of research and interpretation of research findings; and a comprehensive understanding of statistical methods.

The structure moves from basic theory to application, with a strong emphasis on acquisition of an understanding of the scientific principles leading to effective professional practice. Some second and third year units involve applied skills (e.g. personal reflection, demonstration of testing methods and other assessment techniques and methods for facilitating behaviour change) while others emphasise areas in experimental psychology, statistics and research methods.

 

Course Learning Outcomes express learning achievement in terms of what a student should know, understand and be able to do on completion of a course. These outcomes are aligned with the graduate attributes.

Graduate AttributeCourse Learning Outcome
Intellectual rigour

Apply knowledge of the scientific method in thinking about problems related to behaviour and mental processes

Question claims that arise from myth, stereotype, pseudoscience or untested assumptions and recognise and defend against the major fallacies of human thinking

Use reasoning and evidence to recognise, develop, defend, and criticise arguments and persuasive appeals

Creativity

Demonstrate practical skills in laboratory-based and other psychological research

Demonstrate an attitude of critical thinking that includes persistence, open-mindedness, and intellectual engagement

Apply psychological concepts, theories, and research findings to solve problems in everyday life and in society

Ethical practice

Use information in an ethical manner (e.g., acknowledge and respect work and intellectual property rights of others through appropriate citations in oral and written communication)

Exhibit a scientific attitude in critically thinking about, and learning about, human behaviour, and in creative and pragmatic problem solving

Promote evidence-based approaches to understanding and changing human behaviour

Knowledge of a discipline

Acquire an understanding of core topics in the discipline

Describe the basic characteristics of the science of psychology

Explain the major themes (e.g., interaction of genetics and environment) and perspectives (e.g., behavioural, evolutionary, sociocultural) of psychology

Lifelong learning

Demonstrate a capacity for independent learning to sustain personal and professional development in the changing world of the science and practice of psychology

Apply psychological principles to promote personal development through self-regulation in setting and achieving career and personal goals; self-assess performance accurately; incorporate feedback for improved performance; and purposefully evaluate the quality of one’s thinking (metacognition)

Communication and social skills

Write effectively in a variety of other formats (e.g., essays, research proposals, reports) and for a variety of purposes (e.g., informing, arguing)

Demonstrate effective oral communication skills in various formats (e.g., debate, group discussion, presentation) and for various purposes

Write a standard research report using American Psychological Association (APA) structure and formatting conventions

Cultural competence

Recognise and respect social, cultural, linguistic, spiritual, and gender diversity

Recognise how privilege, power, and oppression may affect prejudice, discrimination, and inequity

Reflect on one’s experiences and learn from them in order to identify and articulate one’s personal, sociocultural, and professional values; demonstrate insightful awareness of one’s feelings, motives, and attitudes based on psychological principles

The assessment methods used in this course vary from unit to unit and may include written assignments, oral presentations, research papers, video or audio presentations, and written examinations.

On-campus students experience a variety of teaching approaches including lectures, tutorials, online activities and video-linked or podcast virtual classes. The method of teaching may vary from unit to unit. All of the core units are taught in converged delivery mode, and are available to online students. 

This is a pathway to the Honours year for eligible students and to further training for registration as a psychologist.

Psychologists are employed in health, social and disability services, youth services, corrective services, the armed services, research agencies such as the CSIRO, and in education.

Private industry is also a large employer of those with psychology degrees who receive further specialised training for work in management, human resources and corporate consultancy services.

The course has Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC) accreditation for entrance into postgraduate training.

Notice

The information on this page may be subject to change over time. Please check this web page again before acting and see our disclaimer

From the 1st of June, 2017, the term 'Distance Education' has been replaced with 'Online'

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